Increased prevalence of concentric left ventricular hypertrophy in African-Americans: Will an epidemic of heart failure follow?

Sandeep Kamath, David Markham, Mark H. Drazner

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH), used in this review to denote abnormally increased left ventricular (LV) mass, is an important cardiac trait because of its association with numerous adverse cardiovascular outcomes including myocardial infarction and heart failure. LV mass is typically assessed by noninvasive cardiac imaging (echocardiography or MRI); electrocardiography is an insensitive measure. There are two predominant types of hypertrophy: concentric, where LV wall thickness is increased relative to cavity dimensions, and eccentric, where LV wall thickness is not increased relative to cavity dimensions. Several large studies indicate that the prevalence of concentric LVH is higher in African-Americans versus whites. Although there are data to suggest that concentric LVH results in systolic heart failure in animal models, such data are lacking in humans. How concentric LVH affects the prevalence of systolic and diastolic heart failure in African-Americans needs further study. Given the large burden of LVH among African-Americans, such data are needed to estimate the expected burden and type of heart failure which will occur in the future in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)271-277
Number of pages7
JournalHeart Failure Reviews
Volume11
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

Keywords

  • Ethnicity
  • Heart failure
  • Hypertrophy
  • Remodeling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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