Increased skin blood flow during low intensity vibration in human participants: Analysis of control mechanisms using short-time fourier transform

Yi Ting Tzen, Eileen M. Weinheimer-Haus, Thomas F. Corbiere, Timothy J. Koh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Aim Investigate the immediate effect of low intensity vibration on skin blood flow and its underlying control mechanisms in healthy human participants. Materials and methods One-group pre-post design in a university laboratory setting. Nine adults underwent two bouts of 10-minute vibration (30Hz, peak acceleration 0.4g). Outcome measures include skin blood flow, and skin temperature on the right foot. To examine the control mechanisms underlying the vibration-induced blood flow response, SHORT-TIME Fourier analyses were computed to obtain the spectral densities for three frequency bands: metabolic (0.0095–0.02Hz), neurogenic (0.02–0.06Hz), and myogenic (0.06–0.15Hz). Non-parametric Friedman’s tests were computed to compare changes of the outcome measures and control mechanisms over the course of vibration. Results Vibration increased skin blood flow during both bouts of vibration, however the effect did not last after vibration was terminated. Myogenic spectral density increased during both bouts of vibration, whereas the metabolic and neurogenic spectral densities increased only during the 2nd bout of vibration. Interestingly, only the metabolic spectral density remained elevated after vibration ended. Conclusion Low intensity vibration produced acute increases in skin blood flow mediated in part by vascular control mechanisms of myogenic origin. Further investigation is warranted to determine whether low intensity vibration induces similar increases in skin blood flow in populations prone to developing chronic non-healing wounds, such as spinal cord injury and diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0200247
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

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