Increased susceptibility to lethal effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice with B-cell leukemia

M. J. Muirhead, E. S. Vitetta, P. C. Isakson, K. A. Krolick, J. H. Dees, J. W. Uhr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Susceptibility to the lethal effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) increased more than one hundredfold in BALB/c mice given syngeneic B-cell tumor transplants. The increased susceptibility to LPS that developed during the following weeks paralleled tumor growth in the liver and spleen. The tumor-bearing animals also developed an enhanced capacity to clear colloidal carbon from the blood, consistent with increased activity of the reticuloendothelial system. Although hypersusceptibility to LPS had been reported in a number of animal models, our experiment was the first demonstration in a tumor model that susceptibility correlates with tumor burden.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)745-753
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the National Cancer Institute
Volume66
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1981

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B-Cell Leukemia
Lipopolysaccharides
Neoplasms
Mononuclear Phagocyte System
Tumor Burden
B-Lymphocytes
Carbon
Spleen
Animal Models
Transplants
Liver
Growth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

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Increased susceptibility to lethal effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice with B-cell leukemia. / Muirhead, M. J.; Vitetta, E. S.; Isakson, P. C.; Krolick, K. A.; Dees, J. H.; Uhr, J. W.

In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute, Vol. 66, No. 4, 1981, p. 745-753.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muirhead, M. J. ; Vitetta, E. S. ; Isakson, P. C. ; Krolick, K. A. ; Dees, J. H. ; Uhr, J. W. / Increased susceptibility to lethal effects of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in mice with B-cell leukemia. In: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. 1981 ; Vol. 66, No. 4. pp. 745-753.
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AU - Dees, J. H.

AU - Uhr, J. W.

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