Infection Control in Cystic Fibrosis

Lisa Saiman, Jane Siegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

234 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Over the past 20 years there has been a greater interest in infection control in cystic fibrosis (CF) as patient-to-patient transmission of pathogens has been increasingly demonstrated in this unique patient population. The CF Foundation sponsored a consensus conference to craft recommendations for infection control practices for CF care providers. This review provides a summary of the literature addressing infection control in CF. Burkholderia cepacia complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus have all been shown to spread between patients with CF. Standard precautions, transmission-based precautions including contact and droplet precautions, appropriate hand hygiene for health care workers, patients, and their families, and care of respiratory tract equipment to prevent the transmission of infections agents serve as the foundations of infection control and prevent the acquisition of potential pathogens by patients with CF. The respiratory secretions of all CF patients potentially harbor clinically and epidemiologically important microorganisms, even if they have not yet been detected in cultures from the respiratory tract. CF patients should be educated to contain their secretions and maintain a distance of >3 ft from other CF patients to avoid the transmission of potential pathogens even if culture results are unavailable or negative. To prevent the acquisition of pathogens from respiratory therapy equipment used in health care settings as well as in the home, such equipment should be cleaned and disinfected. It will be critical to measure the dissemination, implementation, and potential impact of these guidelines to monitor changes in practice and reduction in infections.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-71
Number of pages15
JournalClinical Microbiology Reviews
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2004

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Infection Control
Cystic Fibrosis
Infectious Disease Transmission
Equipment and Supplies
Respiratory System
Burkholderia cepacia complex
Hand Hygiene
Delivery of Health Care
Respiratory Therapy
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Staphylococcus aureus
Consensus
Guidelines
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology

Cite this

Infection Control in Cystic Fibrosis. / Saiman, Lisa; Siegel, Jane.

In: Clinical Microbiology Reviews, Vol. 17, No. 1, 01.2004, p. 57-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Saiman, Lisa ; Siegel, Jane. / Infection Control in Cystic Fibrosis. In: Clinical Microbiology Reviews. 2004 ; Vol. 17, No. 1. pp. 57-71.
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