Inhaled nitric oxide: Effects on cerebral growth and injury in a baboon model of premature delivery

Sandra M. Rees, Emily J. Camm, Michelle Loeliger, Sarah Cain, Sandra Dieni, Donald Mccurnin, Philip W. Shaul, Bradley Yoder, Catriona Mclean, Terrie E. Inder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inhaled nitric oxide (iNO) enhances ventilation in very preterm infants, but the effects on the brain remain uncertain. We evaluated the impact of iNO on brain growth and cerebral injury in a premature baboon model. Baboons were delivered at 125 d of gestation (term 185 d of gestation) and ventilated for 14 d with either positive pressure ventilation (PPV) (n = 7) or PPV + iNO (n = 8). Brains were assessed histologically for parameters of development and injury. Compared with gestational controls (n = 7), brain and body weights were reduced but brain-to-body weight ratios were increased in all prematurely delivered (PD) animals; the surface folding index (SFI), was reduced in PPV but not PPV + iNO animals. Compared with controls, the brain damage index was increased (p < 0.05) in both cohorts of PD animals. There was no difference between ventilatory regimens, however, in 25% of animals with iNO therapy, there were organized hematomas in the subarachnoid space. Overall, iNO did not alter the extent of brain damage but did result in the presence of hematomas. These results do not confirm any protective or major injurious effect of nitric oxide therapy on the developing brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)552-558
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Research
Volume61
Issue number5 PART 1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

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Papio
Nitric Oxide
Positive-Pressure Respiration
Wounds and Injuries
Brain
Growth
Hematoma
Body Weight
Pregnancy
Subarachnoid Space
Premature Infants
Ventilation
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Rees, S. M., Camm, E. J., Loeliger, M., Cain, S., Dieni, S., Mccurnin, D., ... Inder, T. E. (2007). Inhaled nitric oxide: Effects on cerebral growth and injury in a baboon model of premature delivery. Pediatric Research, 61(5 PART 1), 552-558. https://doi.org/10.1203/pdr.0b013e318045be20

Inhaled nitric oxide : Effects on cerebral growth and injury in a baboon model of premature delivery. / Rees, Sandra M.; Camm, Emily J.; Loeliger, Michelle; Cain, Sarah; Dieni, Sandra; Mccurnin, Donald; Shaul, Philip W.; Yoder, Bradley; Mclean, Catriona; Inder, Terrie E.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 61, No. 5 PART 1, 05.2007, p. 552-558.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rees, SM, Camm, EJ, Loeliger, M, Cain, S, Dieni, S, Mccurnin, D, Shaul, PW, Yoder, B, Mclean, C & Inder, TE 2007, 'Inhaled nitric oxide: Effects on cerebral growth and injury in a baboon model of premature delivery', Pediatric Research, vol. 61, no. 5 PART 1, pp. 552-558. https://doi.org/10.1203/pdr.0b013e318045be20
Rees, Sandra M. ; Camm, Emily J. ; Loeliger, Michelle ; Cain, Sarah ; Dieni, Sandra ; Mccurnin, Donald ; Shaul, Philip W. ; Yoder, Bradley ; Mclean, Catriona ; Inder, Terrie E. / Inhaled nitric oxide : Effects on cerebral growth and injury in a baboon model of premature delivery. In: Pediatric Research. 2007 ; Vol. 61, No. 5 PART 1. pp. 552-558.
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