Inhibition of gastric emptying and intestinal transit by amphetamine through a mechanism involving an increased secretion of CCK in male rats

Ming Luen Doong, Chien Chen Lu, Mei Mei Kau, Shiow Chwen Tsai, Yu Chung Chiao, Jiann Jong Chen, Jiun Yih Yeh, Ho Lin, Seng Wong Huang, Tseng Shing Chen, Full Young Chang, Paulus S. Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

1. The effect of amphetamine on gastrointestinal (GI) transit and the plasma levels of cholecystokinin (CCK) were studied in male rats. 2. Gastric emptying was inhibited both acutely and chronically by the administration of amphetamine. GI transit was decreased by the acute administration of amphetamine but not affected by the chronic administration of amphetamine. 3. Plasma CCK levels were increased dose-dependently by amphetamine. 4. Proglumide, a CCK receptor antagonist, prevented amphetamine-induced inhibition of gastric emptying and the decrease in GI transit in male rats. 5. The selective CCK(A) receptor antagonist, lorglumide, dose-dependently attenuated the amphetamine-induced inhibition of gastric emptying in male rats. In contrast, the selective CCK(B) receptor antagonist, PD 135,158, did not reverse the effect of amphetamine on gastric emptying. 6. Both lorglumide and PD 135,158 reversed the inhibitory effect of amphetamine on GI transit in male rats. 7. These results suggest that amphetamine-induced inhibition of gastric emptying and intestinal transit is due in part to a mechanism associated with the hypersecretion of endogenous CCK.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1123-1130
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Pharmacology
Volume124
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Amphetamine
  • Cholecystokinin (CCK)
  • Gastric emptying
  • Gastrointestinal (GI) transit
  • Geometric centre
  • Lorglumide
  • PD 135,158
  • Proglumide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

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