Innate immunity to Toxoplasma gondii infection

Felix Yarovinsky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

172 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Toxoplasma gondii is a protozoan parasite of global importance. In the laboratory setting, T. gondii is frequently used as a model pathogen to study mechanisms of T helper 1 (TH1) cell-mediated immunity to intracellular infections. However, recent discoveries have shown that innate type 1 immune responses that involve interferon-γ (IFNγ)-producing natural killer (NK) cells and neutrophils, rather than IFNγ-producing T cells, predetermine host resistance to T. gondii. This Review summarizes the Toll-like receptor (TLR)-dependent mechanisms that are responsible for parasite recognition and for the induction of IFNγ production by NK cells, as well as the emerging data about the TLR-independent mechanisms that lead to the IFNγ-mediated elimination of T. gondii.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-121
Number of pages13
JournalNature Reviews Immunology
Volume14
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

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Toxoplasmosis
Toxoplasma
Innate Immunity
Interferons
Toll-Like Receptors
Natural Killer Cells
Parasites
Th1 Cells
Cellular Immunity
Neutrophils
T-Lymphocytes
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Innate immunity to Toxoplasma gondii infection. / Yarovinsky, Felix.

In: Nature Reviews Immunology, Vol. 14, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 109-121.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yarovinsky, Felix. / Innate immunity to Toxoplasma gondii infection. In: Nature Reviews Immunology. 2014 ; Vol. 14, No. 2. pp. 109-121.
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