Inpatient capacity at children's hospitals during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, United States

Marion R. Sills, Matthew Hall, Evan S. Fieldston, Paul D. Hain, Harold K. Simon, Thomas V. Brogan, Daniel B. Fagbuyi, Michael B. Mundorff, Samir S. Shah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quantifying how close hospitals came to exhausting capacity during the outbreak of pandemic infl uenza A (H1N1) 2009 can help the health care system plan for more virulent pandemics. This ecologic analysis used emergency department (ED) and inpatient data from 34 US children's hospitals. For the 11-week pandemic (H1N1) 2009 period during fall 2009, inpatient occupancy reached 95%, which was lower than the 101% occupancy during the 2008-09 seasonal influenza period. Fewer than 1 additional admission per 10 inpatient beds would have caused hospitals to reach 100% occupancy. Using parameters based on historical precedent, we built 5 models projecting inpatient occupancy, varying the ED visit numbers and admission rate for infl uenza-related ED visits. The 5 scenarios projected median occupancy as high as 132% of capacity. The pandemic did not exhaust inpatient bed capacity, but a more virulent pandemic has the potential to push children's hospitals past their maximum inpatient capacity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1685-1691
Number of pages7
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2011

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Pandemics
Disease Outbreaks
Inpatients
Hospital Emergency Service
Health Systems Plans
Human Influenza
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Sills, M. R., Hall, M., Fieldston, E. S., Hain, P. D., Simon, H. K., Brogan, T. V., ... Shah, S. S. (2011). Inpatient capacity at children's hospitals during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, United States. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 17(9), 1685-1691. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1709.101950

Inpatient capacity at children's hospitals during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, United States. / Sills, Marion R.; Hall, Matthew; Fieldston, Evan S.; Hain, Paul D.; Simon, Harold K.; Brogan, Thomas V.; Fagbuyi, Daniel B.; Mundorff, Michael B.; Shah, Samir S.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 17, No. 9, 09.2011, p. 1685-1691.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sills, MR, Hall, M, Fieldston, ES, Hain, PD, Simon, HK, Brogan, TV, Fagbuyi, DB, Mundorff, MB & Shah, SS 2011, 'Inpatient capacity at children's hospitals during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, United States', Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 17, no. 9, pp. 1685-1691. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1709.101950
Sills, Marion R. ; Hall, Matthew ; Fieldston, Evan S. ; Hain, Paul D. ; Simon, Harold K. ; Brogan, Thomas V. ; Fagbuyi, Daniel B. ; Mundorff, Michael B. ; Shah, Samir S. / Inpatient capacity at children's hospitals during pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, United States. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011 ; Vol. 17, No. 9. pp. 1685-1691.
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