Interrelations of vasoconstrictor sympathetic outflow to skin and core temperature during unilateral sole heating in humans

Daisaku Michikami, Satoshi Iwase, Atsunori Kamiya, Qi Fu, Tadaaki Mano, Akio Suzumura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to clarify how skin sympathetic nerve activity (SSNA) influences the core temperature during local heating of the unilateral sole of the foot for 60 min. We recorded SSNA microneurographically from the tibial or peroneal nerve simultaneously with skin blood flow, sweat rate at heated and non-heated sites, with tympanic temperature (Tty) as the core temperature. Sole heating began to suppress vasoconstrictive SSNA (vasoconstrictor) after 3.4±1.1 min, decrease Tty after 7.4±2.0 min, activate vasoconstrictor after 33.4±2.2 min, and increase Tty after 45.5±2.7 min. Regarding the interaction between vasoconstrictor and Tty during sole heating, we found the following: (1) the capability to suppress vasoconstrictors (decrease rate) showed positive correlations with the time delay from vasoconstrictor suppression to the Tty decrease (r=0.752, p<0.05), and with the Tty decrease rate (r=0.795, p<0.05), (2) the Tty decrease rate was inversely related to the capability to activate vasoconstrictors (increase rate) (r=-0.836, p<0.05), and (3) the capability to activate vasoconstrictors was inversely related to the time delay from vasoconstrictor activation to the Tty increase (r=-0.856, p<0.05) and showed a positive correlation with the Tty increase rate (r=0.819, p<0.05). These significant correlations indicate that the capability to control vasoconstrictors to the skin is one of the determinant factors maintaining core temperature in human thermoregulatory function. In conclusion, human thermoregulatory function is largely dependent on the suppression and activation capability of vasoconstrictors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)55-61
Number of pages7
JournalAutonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical
Volume91
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 13 2001

Fingerprint

Skin Temperature
Vasoconstrictor Agents
Heating
Skin
Temperature
Tibial Nerve
Peroneal Nerve
Sweat
Foot

Keywords

  • Heat loss
  • Microneurography
  • Skin sympathetic nerve activity
  • Thermoregulation
  • Vasoconstriction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems

Cite this

Interrelations of vasoconstrictor sympathetic outflow to skin and core temperature during unilateral sole heating in humans. / Michikami, Daisaku; Iwase, Satoshi; Kamiya, Atsunori; Fu, Qi; Mano, Tadaaki; Suzumura, Akio.

In: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical, Vol. 91, No. 1-2, 13.08.2001, p. 55-61.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Michikami, Daisaku ; Iwase, Satoshi ; Kamiya, Atsunori ; Fu, Qi ; Mano, Tadaaki ; Suzumura, Akio. / Interrelations of vasoconstrictor sympathetic outflow to skin and core temperature during unilateral sole heating in humans. In: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical. 2001 ; Vol. 91, No. 1-2. pp. 55-61.
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