Intraventricular bone dust migration after neuroendoscopy: Report of 2 cases

Tarek Y. El Ahmadieh, Cody B. Wolfe, Joyce Koueik, Bradley E Weprin, Bermans J. Iskandar, Angela V Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Neuroendoscopy has demonstrated safety and efficacy in the treatment of a host of pediatric neurosurgical pathologies. With the increase in its applicability, several associated complications have been described in the literature. A common practice in pediatric neurosurgery is the use of Gelfoam sponge pledget in the burr hole, followed by bone fragments and dust (obtained from the created burr hole), to cover the dural defect. This technique is used to enhance burr hole sealing and potentially prevent CSF leakage from the surgical site. Reports on intracranial bone dust migration associated with this technique are scarce. The authors report 2 cases of intracranial migration of bone fragments after an endoscopic third ventriculostomy and an endoscopic colloid cyst resection. The bone fragment migration was thought to be caused by negative pressure from a lumbar puncture in one case and external trauma to the head in the other. As endoscopy becomes more widely used, it is important to be aware of this potential complication that may in some cases require an intervention. A review of the cases reported in the literature is provided and a technique is suggested to help prevent this complication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)578-583
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics
Volume22
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2018

Fingerprint

Neuroendoscopy
Dust
Bone and Bones
Colloid Cysts
Absorbable Gelatin Sponge
Pediatrics
Ventriculostomy
Spinal Puncture
Neurosurgery
Porifera
Craniocerebral Trauma
Endoscopy
Pathology
Safety
Pressure

Keywords

  • Bone dust migration
  • Endoscopic third ventriculostomy
  • Endoscopy
  • Hydrocephalus
  • Neuroendoscopy
  • Surgical technique

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Intraventricular bone dust migration after neuroendoscopy : Report of 2 cases. / El Ahmadieh, Tarek Y.; Wolfe, Cody B.; Koueik, Joyce; Weprin, Bradley E; Iskandar, Bermans J.; Price, Angela V.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics, Vol. 22, No. 5, 01.11.2018, p. 578-583.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

El Ahmadieh, Tarek Y. ; Wolfe, Cody B. ; Koueik, Joyce ; Weprin, Bradley E ; Iskandar, Bermans J. ; Price, Angela V. / Intraventricular bone dust migration after neuroendoscopy : Report of 2 cases. In: Journal of Neurosurgery: Pediatrics. 2018 ; Vol. 22, No. 5. pp. 578-583.
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