Lack of associations of CHRNA5-A3-B4 genetic variants with smoking cessation treatment outcomes in Caucasian smokers despite associations with baseline smoking

PGRN-PNAT Research Group¶

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Abstract

CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants, rs16969968, rs588765 and rs578776, are consistently associated with tobacco consumption among smokers, but the association with smoking cessation is less consistent. Among the studies that reported significant associations with cessation, the effects were observed in smokers treated with placebo treatment in some studies and conversely in those receiving active pharmacological therapy (bupropion and nicotine replacement therapies) in others. Thus, it remains unclear whether CHRNA5-A3-B4 is a useful marker for optimizing smoking cessation. Using data from 654 Caucasian smokers treated with placebo, nicotine patch or varenicline, we investigated whether CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants were associated with smoking cessation outcomes, and whether there were significant genotype-by-treatment or haplotype-by-treatment interactions. We observed no significant associations between CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants and smoking cessation, despite replicating previous associations with baseline tobacco consumption. At end of treatment the effect size on smoking cessation in the placebo, patch and varenicline groups for rs16969968 [GG vs. GA+AA] was OR = 0.66 (P = 0.23), OR = 1.01 (P = 0.99), and OR = 1.30 (P = 0.36) respectively, of rs588765 [CC vs. CT+TT] was OR = 0.96 (P = 0.90), OR = 0.84 (P = 0.58), and OR = 0.74 (P = 0.29) respectively, and for rs578776 [GG vs. GA+AA] on smoking cessation was OR = 1.02 (P = 0.95), OR = 0.75 (P = 0.35), and OR = 1.20 (P = 0.51) respectively. Furthermore, we observed no associations with cessation using the CHRNA5-A3-B4 haplotype (constructed using rs16969968 and rs588765), nor did we observe any significant genotype-by-treatment interactions, with or without adjusting for the rate of nicotine metabolism (all P>0.05). We also observed no significant genetic associations with 6 month or 12 month smoking abstinence. In conclusion, we found no association between CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants and smoking cessation rates in this clinical trial; however, as expected, significant associations with baseline tobacco consumption were replicated. Our data suggest that CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene variants do not exhibit a robust association with smoking cessation and are unlikely to be useful for clinically optimizing smoking cessation pharmacotherapy for Caucasian smokers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0128109
JournalPLoS One
Volume10
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 26 2015

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Withholding Treatment
Tobacco
nicotine
Smoking Cessation
placebos
tobacco
Smoking
Nicotine
haplotypes
Tobacco Use Cessation Products
Drug therapy
Bupropion
therapeutics
genotype
Tobacco Use
Metabolism
clinical trials
Genes
Placebos
Haplotypes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Lack of associations of CHRNA5-A3-B4 genetic variants with smoking cessation treatment outcomes in Caucasian smokers despite associations with baseline smoking. / PGRN-PNAT Research Group¶.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 10, No. 5, e0128109, 26.05.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{3277efba26e24a689ac935123af751d8,
title = "Lack of associations of CHRNA5-A3-B4 genetic variants with smoking cessation treatment outcomes in Caucasian smokers despite associations with baseline smoking",
abstract = "CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants, rs16969968, rs588765 and rs578776, are consistently associated with tobacco consumption among smokers, but the association with smoking cessation is less consistent. Among the studies that reported significant associations with cessation, the effects were observed in smokers treated with placebo treatment in some studies and conversely in those receiving active pharmacological therapy (bupropion and nicotine replacement therapies) in others. Thus, it remains unclear whether CHRNA5-A3-B4 is a useful marker for optimizing smoking cessation. Using data from 654 Caucasian smokers treated with placebo, nicotine patch or varenicline, we investigated whether CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants were associated with smoking cessation outcomes, and whether there were significant genotype-by-treatment or haplotype-by-treatment interactions. We observed no significant associations between CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants and smoking cessation, despite replicating previous associations with baseline tobacco consumption. At end of treatment the effect size on smoking cessation in the placebo, patch and varenicline groups for rs16969968 [GG vs. GA+AA] was OR = 0.66 (P = 0.23), OR = 1.01 (P = 0.99), and OR = 1.30 (P = 0.36) respectively, of rs588765 [CC vs. CT+TT] was OR = 0.96 (P = 0.90), OR = 0.84 (P = 0.58), and OR = 0.74 (P = 0.29) respectively, and for rs578776 [GG vs. GA+AA] on smoking cessation was OR = 1.02 (P = 0.95), OR = 0.75 (P = 0.35), and OR = 1.20 (P = 0.51) respectively. Furthermore, we observed no associations with cessation using the CHRNA5-A3-B4 haplotype (constructed using rs16969968 and rs588765), nor did we observe any significant genotype-by-treatment interactions, with or without adjusting for the rate of nicotine metabolism (all P>0.05). We also observed no significant genetic associations with 6 month or 12 month smoking abstinence. In conclusion, we found no association between CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants and smoking cessation rates in this clinical trial; however, as expected, significant associations with baseline tobacco consumption were replicated. Our data suggest that CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene variants do not exhibit a robust association with smoking cessation and are unlikely to be useful for clinically optimizing smoking cessation pharmacotherapy for Caucasian smokers.",
author = "{PGRN-PNAT Research Group¶} and Tyndale, {Rachel F.} and Zhu, {Andy Z.X.} and George, {Tony P.} and Cinciripini Paul and Hawk, {Larry W.} and Schnoll, {Robert A.} and Swan, {Gary E.} and Benowitz, {Neal L.} and Heitjan, {Daniel F.} and Caryn Lerman and Frank Leone and Henry Glick and Angela Pinto and Paul Sanborn and Peter Gariti and Richard Landis and Maria Novalen and Bin Zhao and Ewa Hoffmann and Qian Zhou and Adel Aziziyeh and Martin Mahoney and Maher Karam-Hage and David Conti and Andrew Bergen",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
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T1 - Lack of associations of CHRNA5-A3-B4 genetic variants with smoking cessation treatment outcomes in Caucasian smokers despite associations with baseline smoking

AU - PGRN-PNAT Research Group¶

AU - Tyndale, Rachel F.

AU - Zhu, Andy Z.X.

AU - George, Tony P.

AU - Paul, Cinciripini

AU - Hawk, Larry W.

AU - Schnoll, Robert A.

AU - Swan, Gary E.

AU - Benowitz, Neal L.

AU - Heitjan, Daniel F.

AU - Lerman, Caryn

AU - Leone, Frank

AU - Glick, Henry

AU - Pinto, Angela

AU - Sanborn, Paul

AU - Gariti, Peter

AU - Landis, Richard

AU - Novalen, Maria

AU - Zhao, Bin

AU - Hoffmann, Ewa

AU - Zhou, Qian

AU - Aziziyeh, Adel

AU - Mahoney, Martin

AU - Karam-Hage, Maher

AU - Conti, David

AU - Bergen, Andrew

PY - 2015/5/26

Y1 - 2015/5/26

N2 - CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants, rs16969968, rs588765 and rs578776, are consistently associated with tobacco consumption among smokers, but the association with smoking cessation is less consistent. Among the studies that reported significant associations with cessation, the effects were observed in smokers treated with placebo treatment in some studies and conversely in those receiving active pharmacological therapy (bupropion and nicotine replacement therapies) in others. Thus, it remains unclear whether CHRNA5-A3-B4 is a useful marker for optimizing smoking cessation. Using data from 654 Caucasian smokers treated with placebo, nicotine patch or varenicline, we investigated whether CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants were associated with smoking cessation outcomes, and whether there were significant genotype-by-treatment or haplotype-by-treatment interactions. We observed no significant associations between CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants and smoking cessation, despite replicating previous associations with baseline tobacco consumption. At end of treatment the effect size on smoking cessation in the placebo, patch and varenicline groups for rs16969968 [GG vs. GA+AA] was OR = 0.66 (P = 0.23), OR = 1.01 (P = 0.99), and OR = 1.30 (P = 0.36) respectively, of rs588765 [CC vs. CT+TT] was OR = 0.96 (P = 0.90), OR = 0.84 (P = 0.58), and OR = 0.74 (P = 0.29) respectively, and for rs578776 [GG vs. GA+AA] on smoking cessation was OR = 1.02 (P = 0.95), OR = 0.75 (P = 0.35), and OR = 1.20 (P = 0.51) respectively. Furthermore, we observed no associations with cessation using the CHRNA5-A3-B4 haplotype (constructed using rs16969968 and rs588765), nor did we observe any significant genotype-by-treatment interactions, with or without adjusting for the rate of nicotine metabolism (all P>0.05). We also observed no significant genetic associations with 6 month or 12 month smoking abstinence. In conclusion, we found no association between CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants and smoking cessation rates in this clinical trial; however, as expected, significant associations with baseline tobacco consumption were replicated. Our data suggest that CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene variants do not exhibit a robust association with smoking cessation and are unlikely to be useful for clinically optimizing smoking cessation pharmacotherapy for Caucasian smokers.

AB - CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants, rs16969968, rs588765 and rs578776, are consistently associated with tobacco consumption among smokers, but the association with smoking cessation is less consistent. Among the studies that reported significant associations with cessation, the effects were observed in smokers treated with placebo treatment in some studies and conversely in those receiving active pharmacological therapy (bupropion and nicotine replacement therapies) in others. Thus, it remains unclear whether CHRNA5-A3-B4 is a useful marker for optimizing smoking cessation. Using data from 654 Caucasian smokers treated with placebo, nicotine patch or varenicline, we investigated whether CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants were associated with smoking cessation outcomes, and whether there were significant genotype-by-treatment or haplotype-by-treatment interactions. We observed no significant associations between CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants and smoking cessation, despite replicating previous associations with baseline tobacco consumption. At end of treatment the effect size on smoking cessation in the placebo, patch and varenicline groups for rs16969968 [GG vs. GA+AA] was OR = 0.66 (P = 0.23), OR = 1.01 (P = 0.99), and OR = 1.30 (P = 0.36) respectively, of rs588765 [CC vs. CT+TT] was OR = 0.96 (P = 0.90), OR = 0.84 (P = 0.58), and OR = 0.74 (P = 0.29) respectively, and for rs578776 [GG vs. GA+AA] on smoking cessation was OR = 1.02 (P = 0.95), OR = 0.75 (P = 0.35), and OR = 1.20 (P = 0.51) respectively. Furthermore, we observed no associations with cessation using the CHRNA5-A3-B4 haplotype (constructed using rs16969968 and rs588765), nor did we observe any significant genotype-by-treatment interactions, with or without adjusting for the rate of nicotine metabolism (all P>0.05). We also observed no significant genetic associations with 6 month or 12 month smoking abstinence. In conclusion, we found no association between CHRNA5-A3-B4 variants and smoking cessation rates in this clinical trial; however, as expected, significant associations with baseline tobacco consumption were replicated. Our data suggest that CHRNA5-A3-B4 gene variants do not exhibit a robust association with smoking cessation and are unlikely to be useful for clinically optimizing smoking cessation pharmacotherapy for Caucasian smokers.

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