Linezolid: Its role in the treatment of gram-positive, drug-resistant bacterial infections

Paul W. Ament, Namirah Jamshed, John P. Horne

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Abstract

While the choices available for the management of gram-positive, drug-resistant bacterial infections are becoming limited, antimicrobial resistance is becoming increasingly problematic because of the widespread overuse of antibiotics. Linezolid is a synthetic antibiotic belonging to a new class of antimicrobials called the oxazolidinones. Linezolid disrupts bacterial growth by inhibiting the initiation process of protein synthesis - a mechanism of action that is unique to this class of drugs. It is well absorbed with high bioavailability that allows conversion to oral therapy as soon as the patient is clinically stable. It has been approved for certain gram-positive infections including certain drug-resistant enterococcus, staphylococcus, and pneumococcus strains. It is generally well tolerated, with myelosuppression being the most serious adverse effect. As a non-selective inhibitor of monoamine oxidase, caution is recommended when used with adrenergic or serotonergic agents (e.g., tyramine, dopamine, pseudoephedrine, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors). Judicious use of this medication should help physicians treat patients with multidrug-resistant infections. Copyright

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)663-670
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume65
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Feb 15 2002

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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