Lipoprotein(a) and apolipoprotein(a) isoforms: No association with coronary artery calcification in the Dallas heart study

Rudy Guerra, Zhaoxia Yu, Santica Marcovina, Ronald M Peshock, Jonathan C Cohen, Helen H Hobbs

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Abstract

Background - Elevated plasma levels of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] are an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease in whites. Blacks have 2- to 3-fold higher plasma levels of Lp(a) than whites and yet do not have a correspondingly higher rate of coronary events. It remains unclear whether elevated plasma levels of Lp(a) are an independent risk factor for coronary atherosclerosis in individuals of African descent. Methods and Results - The relationship between plasma levels of Lp(a), apolipoprotein(a) isoform sizes, and the presence of coronary calcium was examined in 761 blacks and 527 whites (men aged >40 years, women aged >45 years) from a population-based sample. No relationship was found between plasma levels of Lp(a), apolipoprotein(a) isoform size, or a combination of these 2 variables and coronary artery calcium (CAC) in whites or blacks. No correlation was observed between plasma levels of Lp(a) and coronary calcium scores in any group, although all black men with very high plasma levels of Lp(a) (>300 μmol/L; n=7) were CAC-positive. Whites with high plasma levels of Lp(a) plus elevated plasma levels of LDL cholesterol (men) or reduced levels of HDL cholesterol (men and women) or who smoked (women) had a higher prevalence of CAC. In contrast, no joint effects between plasma levels of Lp(a) and other cardiovascular risk factors on coronary calcium were found in blacks. Conclusions - No consistent independent relationship between plasma levels of Lp(a) or apolipoprotein(a) isoform size and coronary calcium was found in whites or blacks.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1471-1479
Number of pages9
JournalCirculation
Volume111
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 29 2005

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Keywords

  • Apolipoproteins
  • Arteriosclerosis
  • Coronary disease
  • Lipoproteins
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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