Long-term trends in the incidence of heart failure after myocardial infarction

Raghava S. Velagaleti, Michael J. Pencina, Joanne M. Murabito, Thomas J. Wang, Nisha I. Parikh, Ralph B. D'Agostino, Daniel Levy, William B. Kannel, Ramachandran S. Vasan

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308 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background-Although mortality after myocardial infarction (MI) has declined in the United States in recent decades, there have been few community-based investigations of the long-term trends in the incidence of heart failure after MI, and their results appear to be conflicting. Methods and Results-We evaluated 676 Framingham Heart Study participants between 45 and 85 years of age (mean age 67 years, 34% women) who developed a first MI between 1970 and 1999. We assessed the incidence rates of heart failure and of death without heart failure in each of 3 decades (1970 to 1979, 1980 to 1989, and 1990 to 1999). We estimated the multivariable-adjusted risk of events in the latter 2 decades, with the period 1970 to 1979 serving as the referent. The 30-day incidence of heart failure after MI rose from 10% in 1970 to 1979 to 23.1% in 1990 to 1999 (P for trend 0.003), whereas 30-day mortality after MI declined from 12.2% (1970 to 1979) to 4.1% (1990 to 1999). The 5-year incidence of heart failure after MI rose from 27.6% in 1970 to 1979 to 31.9% in 1990 to 1999 (P for trend 0.02), whereas 5-year mortality after MI declined from 41.1% (1970 to 1979) to 17.3% (1990 to 1999). In multivariable analyses, compared with the period 1970 to 1979, we observed higher 30-day (risk ratio 2.05, 95% confidence interval 1.25 to 3.36) and 5-year (risk ratio 1.74, 95% confidence interval 1.07 to 2.84) risks of heart failure in the decade 1990 to 1999. These trends were accompanied by lower 30-day (risk ratio 0.21, 95% confidence interval 0.09 to 0.47) and 5-year (risk ratio 0.31, 95% confidence interval 0.18 to 0.54) mortality rates in 1990 to 1999. Conclusions-In the present community-based sample, we observed an increase in the incidence of heart failure in recent decades that paralleled the decrease in mortality after MI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2057-2062
Number of pages6
JournalCirculation
Volume118
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 11 2008

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • Heart failure
  • Myocardial infarction
  • Prognosis
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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