Longitudinal associations of maternal depressive symptoms, maternal involvement, and diabetes management across adolescence

Deborah J. Wiebe, Donna Gelfand, Jorie M. Butler, Carolyn Korbel, Katherine T. Fortenberry, Jennifer E. McCabe, Cynthia A. Berg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

ObjectiveTo examine whether maternal depressive symptoms: (a) predicted the level of maternal involvement in diabetes management tasks across adolescence; and (b) moderated associations of involvement with adolescent adherence, metabolic control, and depression.MethodsEighty-two youth aged 10-15 years with type 1 diabetes and their mothers completed measures at baseline and 16 months later. Participants rated maternal involvement in diabetes tasks, adherence, and depressive symptoms; metabolic control was indexed from medical records.ResultsMaternal depressive symptoms were associated with higher involvement at baseline, and slower declines in involvement across time. At baseline, involvement was associated with lower adolescent depression and better metabolic control, but this association was stronger when mothers reported fewer depressive symptoms. Interactions of maternal depression with involvement across time suggested maternal involvement was associated with better subsequent adherence primarily when mothers reported fewer depressive symptoms. ConclusionsMothers' depressive symptoms may undermine her care-giving effectiveness during adolescence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)837-846
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume36
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • diabetes management
  • maternal depression
  • maternal involvement
  • type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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