Lung cancer

Hak Choy, Harvey I. Pass, Rafael Rosell, Anne Traynor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and throughout the world.1 In the United States, the manufactured cigarette emerged as the tobacco product of choice shortly after the turn of the 20th century. Lung cancer surfaced after years of inhalation of cigarette smoke, first among men and then among women. From 1995 to 1999, cigarette smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) accounted for approximately 160,000 annual deaths in the United States. Each year, 127,813 Americans die from smoking-attributable lung cancer deaths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationOncology: An Evidence-Based Approach
PublisherSpringer New York
Pages552-628
Number of pages77
ISBN (Print)0387242910, 9780387242910
DOIs
StatePublished - 2006

Fingerprint

Tobacco Products
Lung Neoplasms
Smoke
Smoking
Environmental Exposure
Inhalation
Tobacco
Cause of Death
Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Choy, H., Pass, H. I., Rosell, R., & Traynor, A. (2006). Lung cancer. In Oncology: An Evidence-Based Approach (pp. 552-628). Springer New York. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-31056-8_37

Lung cancer. / Choy, Hak; Pass, Harvey I.; Rosell, Rafael; Traynor, Anne.

Oncology: An Evidence-Based Approach. Springer New York, 2006. p. 552-628.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Choy, H, Pass, HI, Rosell, R & Traynor, A 2006, Lung cancer. in Oncology: An Evidence-Based Approach. Springer New York, pp. 552-628. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-31056-8_37
Choy H, Pass HI, Rosell R, Traynor A. Lung cancer. In Oncology: An Evidence-Based Approach. Springer New York. 2006. p. 552-628 https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-31056-8_37
Choy, Hak ; Pass, Harvey I. ; Rosell, Rafael ; Traynor, Anne. / Lung cancer. Oncology: An Evidence-Based Approach. Springer New York, 2006. pp. 552-628
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