MAP kinases and their roles in pancreatic beta-cells.

Shih Khoo, Tara Beers Gibson, Don Arnette, Michael Lawrence, Bridgette January, Kathleen McGlynn, Colleen A. Vanderbilt, Steven C. Griffen, Michael S. German, Melanie H. Cobb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We discuss our work examining regulation and functions of mitogen-activated protein kinases, particularly ERK1 and ERK2, in pancreatic beta-cells. These enzymes are activated by glucose, other nutrients, and insulinogenic hormones. Their activation by these agents is calcium-dependent. A number of other stimuli also activate ERK1/2, but by mechanisms distinct from those involved in nutrient sensing. Inhibition of ERK1/2 has no apparent effect on insulin secretion measured after 2 h. On the other hand, ERK1/2 activity is required for maximal glucose-dependent activation of the insulin gene promoter. The primary effort has focused on INS-1 cell lines, with supporting and confirmatory studies in intact islets and other beta-cell lines, indicating the generality of our findings in beta-cell function. Thus ERK1/2 participate in transmitting glucose-sensing information to beta-cell functions. These kinases most likely act directly and indirectly on multiple pathways that regulate beta-cell function and, in particular, to transduce an elevated glucose signal into insulin gene transcription.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)191-200
Number of pages10
JournalCell Biochemistry and Biophysics
Volume40
Issue number3 Suppl
StatePublished - 2004

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Insulin-Secreting Cells
Phosphotransferases
Glucose
Insulin
Nutrients
Genes
Chemical activation
Cells
Cell Line
Food
Transcription
Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases
Transcriptional Activation
Hormones
Calcium
Enzymes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Khoo, S., Gibson, T. B., Arnette, D., Lawrence, M., January, B., McGlynn, K., ... Cobb, M. H. (2004). MAP kinases and their roles in pancreatic beta-cells. Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics, 40(3 Suppl), 191-200.

MAP kinases and their roles in pancreatic beta-cells. / Khoo, Shih; Gibson, Tara Beers; Arnette, Don; Lawrence, Michael; January, Bridgette; McGlynn, Kathleen; Vanderbilt, Colleen A.; Griffen, Steven C.; German, Michael S.; Cobb, Melanie H.

In: Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics, Vol. 40, No. 3 Suppl, 2004, p. 191-200.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Khoo, S, Gibson, TB, Arnette, D, Lawrence, M, January, B, McGlynn, K, Vanderbilt, CA, Griffen, SC, German, MS & Cobb, MH 2004, 'MAP kinases and their roles in pancreatic beta-cells.', Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics, vol. 40, no. 3 Suppl, pp. 191-200.
Khoo S, Gibson TB, Arnette D, Lawrence M, January B, McGlynn K et al. MAP kinases and their roles in pancreatic beta-cells. Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics. 2004;40(3 Suppl):191-200.
Khoo, Shih ; Gibson, Tara Beers ; Arnette, Don ; Lawrence, Michael ; January, Bridgette ; McGlynn, Kathleen ; Vanderbilt, Colleen A. ; Griffen, Steven C. ; German, Michael S. ; Cobb, Melanie H. / MAP kinases and their roles in pancreatic beta-cells. In: Cell Biochemistry and Biophysics. 2004 ; Vol. 40, No. 3 Suppl. pp. 191-200.
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