Microsurgical management of extremity wounds in diabetics with peripheral vascular disease

S. N. Oishi, L. S. Levin, W. C. Pederson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Plastic surgeons are frequently called upon to evaluate wounds in diabetic patients with compromised vascular inflow. Although a few authors have reported success in coverage of such wounds with microsurgical techniques, enthusiasm for this procedure has remained low due to concerns about flap viability, occlusion of flow to the distal limb, and the usually poor systemic status of such patients. We report here on our experience with 19 diabetic patients with peripheral vascular disease and a nonhealing wound of the lower extremity treated over the last 4 years with microvascular tissue transfer. Two patients (10.5 percent) suffered anastomotic difficulties and there was one flap loss (5 percent). Major morbidity rates were acceptable, with only one perioperative death (5 percent) and three cases of nonfatal major systemic difficulties in the immediate postoperative period (16 percent). Despite the importation of well-vascularized tissue, local morbidity at the recipient site was seen in nine patients (47 percent). The overall limb salvage rate was 72 percent during the period of follow-up, which averaged 22 months. Despite this loss of five limbs, all but three of the patients eventually returned to ambulation. The overall death rate in our series was only 2/19 (10.5 percent) over the period of follow-up. Although further work needs to be done in this difficult group of patients to ascertain the long-term benefit (especially relative to the cost/benefit ratio), we feel that this series confirms the safety and short-term efficacy of microsurgical treatment of such individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)485-492
Number of pages8
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume92
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1993

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Peripheral Vascular Diseases
Extremities
Wounds and Injuries
Morbidity
Limb Salvage
Postoperative Period
Walking
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Blood Vessels
Lower Extremity
Safety
Mortality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Microsurgical management of extremity wounds in diabetics with peripheral vascular disease. / Oishi, S. N.; Levin, L. S.; Pederson, W. C.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 92, No. 3, 1993, p. 485-492.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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