Moderators of continuation phase cognitive therapy's effects on relapse, recurrence, remission, and recovery from depression

Jeffrey R. Vittengl, Lee Anna Clark, Robin B. Jarrett

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

About half of patients who respond to acute-phase cognitive therapy (CT) for major depressive disorder (MDD) will relapse/recur within 2 years; continuation-phase CT lowers this risk. We analyzed demographic, clinical, cognitive, social-interpersonal, and personality variables to clarify which patients continuation-phase CT helps to avoid relapse and recurrence and achieve remission and recovery. Participants had recurrent MDD, responded to acute-phase CT, were randomized to 8 months of continuation-phase CT (n = 41) or assessment control (n = 43), and were assessed 16 additional months (Jarrett et al., 2001). Consistent with an underlying risk-reduction model, continuation-phase CT was helpful for responders to acute-phase CT with greater risk and/or dysfunction as follows: Younger patients with earlier MDD onset who displayed greater dysfunctional attitudes and lower self-efficacy; personality traits suggesting low positive activation (e.g., reduced energy, enthusiasm, gregariousness); and transiently elevated depressive symptoms late in acute-phase CT and residual symptoms after acute-phase CT response. We emphasize the need for replication of these results before clinical application.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-458
Number of pages10
JournalBehaviour Research and Therapy
Volume48
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2010

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Cognitive Therapy
Depression
Recurrence
Major Depressive Disorder
Personality
Self Efficacy
Risk Reduction Behavior
Demography

Keywords

  • Continuation-phase cognitive therapy
  • Depression
  • Moderators
  • Recovery
  • Recurrence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Moderators of continuation phase cognitive therapy's effects on relapse, recurrence, remission, and recovery from depression. / Vittengl, Jeffrey R.; Clark, Lee Anna; Jarrett, Robin B.

In: Behaviour Research and Therapy, Vol. 48, No. 6, 06.2010, p. 449-458.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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