Murine colitis reveals a disease-associated bacteriophage community

Breck A. Duerkop, Manuel Kleiner, David Paez-Espino, Wenhan Zhu, Brian Bushnell, Brian Hassell, Sebastian E. Winter, Nikos C. Kyrpides, Lora V. Hooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The dysregulation of intestinal microbial communities is associated with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Studies aimed at understanding the contribution of the microbiota to inflammatory diseases have primarily focused on bacteria, yet the intestine harbours a viral component dominated by prokaryotic viruses known as bacteriophages (phages). Phage numbers are elevated at the intestinal mucosal surface and phages increase in abundance during IBD, suggesting that phages play an unidentified role in IBD. We used a sequence-independent approach for the selection of viral contigs and then applied quantitative metagenomics to study intestinal phages in a mouse model of colitis. We discovered that during colitis the intestinal phage population is altered and transitions from an ordered state to a stochastic dysbiosis. We identified phages specific to pathobiotic hosts associated with intestinal disease, whose abundances are altered during colitis. Additionally, phage populations in healthy and diseased mice overlapped with phages from healthy humans and humans with IBD. Our findings indicate that intestinal phage communities are altered during inflammatory disease, establishing a platform for investigating phage involvement in IBD.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNature Microbiology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Colitis
Bacteriophages
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Dysbiosis
Metagenomics
Intestinal Diseases
Viral Structures
Microbiota
Population
Intestines
Viruses
Bacteria

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Genetics
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Duerkop, B. A., Kleiner, M., Paez-Espino, D., Zhu, W., Bushnell, B., Hassell, B., ... Hooper, L. V. (Accepted/In press). Murine colitis reveals a disease-associated bacteriophage community. Nature Microbiology. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41564-018-0210-y

Murine colitis reveals a disease-associated bacteriophage community. / Duerkop, Breck A.; Kleiner, Manuel; Paez-Espino, David; Zhu, Wenhan; Bushnell, Brian; Hassell, Brian; Winter, Sebastian E.; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Hooper, Lora V.

In: Nature Microbiology, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Duerkop BA, Kleiner M, Paez-Espino D, Zhu W, Bushnell B, Hassell B et al. Murine colitis reveals a disease-associated bacteriophage community. Nature Microbiology. 2018 Jan 1. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41564-018-0210-y
Duerkop, Breck A. ; Kleiner, Manuel ; Paez-Espino, David ; Zhu, Wenhan ; Bushnell, Brian ; Hassell, Brian ; Winter, Sebastian E. ; Kyrpides, Nikos C. ; Hooper, Lora V. / Murine colitis reveals a disease-associated bacteriophage community. In: Nature Microbiology. 2018.
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