Nonspecificity of short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) as a technique of fat suppression: Pitfalls in image interpretation

Glenn Krinsky, Neil M. Rofsky, Jeffrey C. Weinreb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) and the rapid acquisition with relaxation enhancement (RARE) version of STIR are commonly used pulse sequences that are sensitive enough to detect a broad range of pathologic conditions. In addition to suppressing the signal from fat, the STIR sequence achieves additive T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and proton density-weighted contrast to facilitate lesion conspicuity. Fat suppression with STIR sequences is based on short T1 relaxation rates and therefore is not tissue specific. The signal from any tissue with a short T1, similar to that of fat, may be nulled as well. The signal from tissues that accumulate paramagnetic contrast agents also may be suppressed with STIR sequences when an appropriate degree of T1 shortening results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)523-526
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume166
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1996

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Sequence Inversion
Fats
Contrast Media
Protons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Nonspecificity of short inversion time inversion recovery (STIR) as a technique of fat suppression : Pitfalls in image interpretation. / Krinsky, Glenn; Rofsky, Neil M.; Weinreb, Jeffrey C.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 166, No. 3, 03.1996, p. 523-526.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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