Novel use of poly-L-lactic acid filler for the treatment of facial cutaneous atrophy in patients with connective tissue disease

Jarod John Pamatmat, Cristian D. Gonzalez, Rebecca Euwer, Erika Summers, David Smart, Heather W. Goff

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: Patients with connective tissue disease (CTD) often suffer from facial cutaneous defects and resultant facial asymmetry. Unfortunately, these issues have been known to be difficult-to-treat, and concern exists regarding the use of cosmetic procedures in this patient population due to the theoretical risk of disease flare-up or reactivation. Injectable poly-L-lactic acid (PLLA) is one type of filler that has been used to treat skin atrophy in patients with morphea and lupus erythematous panniculitis. However, overall, there is a dearth in literature regarding the safety and efficacy of PLLA filler in patients with CTDs. Aims: This case series intends to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PLLA filler in treating facial atrophy in patients with CTDs. Patients/Methods: Three patients underwent various treatment courses involving the use of PLLA filler to treat facial atrophy. Results: Two patients demonstrated significant improvement in facial atrophy following their treatment course. No patient experienced reactivation or exacerbation of their CTD following PLLA injection. Conclusion: PLLA filler appears to have good viability as a safe and potentially effective treatment for facial atrophy in patients with CTDs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3462-3466
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cosmetic Dermatology
Volume20
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2021
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • connective tissue disease
  • filler
  • lupus erythematosus panniculitis
  • poly-L-lactic acid
  • scleroderma
  • soft tissue augmentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dermatology

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