Parent-provider paediatric literacy communication: A curriculum for future primary care providers

Tiffany B Kindratt, Brittany Bernard, Jade Webb, Patti Pagels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Reach Out and Read promotes early literacy and school readiness by incorporating book delivery and anticipatory guidance into well-child visits. There is a need to train future healthcare providers in the knowledge and skills to communicate with parents/caregivers about early childhood literacy. We developed and evaluated a curriculum to improve learners’ knowledge, attitudes, and skills towards the incorporation of parent-provider literacy communication into well-child visits. Methods: Family medicine residents (n = 30), physician assistant students (n = 36), and medical students (n = 28) participated in a curriculum consisting of service learning, online didactic training, objective structured clinical exams (OSCEs) and a debriefing session. Standardized patients (SPs; 6 months to 5 years) and standardized patient caregivers were recruited and trained. Learners were evaluated on their abilities to offer books to patients, provide anticipatory guidance, and demonstrate parent-provider communication skills. Knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction were collected pre- and post-curriculum. Results: Significant increases in total knowledge were observed after completing curriculum activities (p < 0.001). All attitudes improved after training (p < 0.05). All learners (100%) recommended that caregivers talk back and forth with their 6‑ to 12-month-old babies and make eye contact. Few (18.2%) learners recommended playing games like ‘peek-a-boo’ while reading. When caregivers evaluated learners’ basic parent-provider communication skills, all reported that the learners treated them with respect and used plain language. Discussion: Our curriculum extends beyond previous studies by measuring recommended books, anticipatory guidance, and communication skills using paediatric SPs and standardized patient caregivers. Curriculum activities can be tailored to best promote parent-provider literacy communication training in other programs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)110-117
Number of pages8
JournalPerspectives on Medical Education
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2019

Fingerprint

Curriculum
Caregivers
caregiver
Primary Health Care
parents
literacy
Communication
Pediatrics
curriculum
communication skills
communication
Physician Assistants
school readiness
Aptitude
Medical Students
didactics
baby
Health Personnel
assistant
medical student

Keywords

  • Early childhood literacy
  • Medical students
  • Objective structured clinical exam
  • Paediatrics
  • Physician assistant
  • Postgraduate
  • Primary care
  • Reach Out and Read

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Parent-provider paediatric literacy communication : A curriculum for future primary care providers. / Kindratt, Tiffany B; Bernard, Brittany; Webb, Jade; Pagels, Patti.

In: Perspectives on Medical Education, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 110-117.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{cee8646584654e588f27fe6b646bf0c9,
title = "Parent-provider paediatric literacy communication: A curriculum for future primary care providers",
abstract = "Background: Reach Out and Read promotes early literacy and school readiness by incorporating book delivery and anticipatory guidance into well-child visits. There is a need to train future healthcare providers in the knowledge and skills to communicate with parents/caregivers about early childhood literacy. We developed and evaluated a curriculum to improve learners’ knowledge, attitudes, and skills towards the incorporation of parent-provider literacy communication into well-child visits. Methods: Family medicine residents (n = 30), physician assistant students (n = 36), and medical students (n = 28) participated in a curriculum consisting of service learning, online didactic training, objective structured clinical exams (OSCEs) and a debriefing session. Standardized patients (SPs; 6 months to 5 years) and standardized patient caregivers were recruited and trained. Learners were evaluated on their abilities to offer books to patients, provide anticipatory guidance, and demonstrate parent-provider communication skills. Knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction were collected pre- and post-curriculum. Results: Significant increases in total knowledge were observed after completing curriculum activities (p < 0.001). All attitudes improved after training (p < 0.05). All learners (100{\%}) recommended that caregivers talk back and forth with their 6‑ to 12-month-old babies and make eye contact. Few (18.2{\%}) learners recommended playing games like ‘peek-a-boo’ while reading. When caregivers evaluated learners’ basic parent-provider communication skills, all reported that the learners treated them with respect and used plain language. Discussion: Our curriculum extends beyond previous studies by measuring recommended books, anticipatory guidance, and communication skills using paediatric SPs and standardized patient caregivers. Curriculum activities can be tailored to best promote parent-provider literacy communication training in other programs.",
keywords = "Early childhood literacy, Medical students, Objective structured clinical exam, Paediatrics, Physician assistant, Postgraduate, Primary care, Reach Out and Read",
author = "Kindratt, {Tiffany B} and Brittany Bernard and Jade Webb and Patti Pagels",
year = "2019",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s40037-019-0503-8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "110--117",
journal = "Perspectives on Medical Education",
issn = "2212-2761",
publisher = "Bohn Stafleu van Loghum",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Parent-provider paediatric literacy communication

T2 - A curriculum for future primary care providers

AU - Kindratt, Tiffany B

AU - Bernard, Brittany

AU - Webb, Jade

AU - Pagels, Patti

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Background: Reach Out and Read promotes early literacy and school readiness by incorporating book delivery and anticipatory guidance into well-child visits. There is a need to train future healthcare providers in the knowledge and skills to communicate with parents/caregivers about early childhood literacy. We developed and evaluated a curriculum to improve learners’ knowledge, attitudes, and skills towards the incorporation of parent-provider literacy communication into well-child visits. Methods: Family medicine residents (n = 30), physician assistant students (n = 36), and medical students (n = 28) participated in a curriculum consisting of service learning, online didactic training, objective structured clinical exams (OSCEs) and a debriefing session. Standardized patients (SPs; 6 months to 5 years) and standardized patient caregivers were recruited and trained. Learners were evaluated on their abilities to offer books to patients, provide anticipatory guidance, and demonstrate parent-provider communication skills. Knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction were collected pre- and post-curriculum. Results: Significant increases in total knowledge were observed after completing curriculum activities (p < 0.001). All attitudes improved after training (p < 0.05). All learners (100%) recommended that caregivers talk back and forth with their 6‑ to 12-month-old babies and make eye contact. Few (18.2%) learners recommended playing games like ‘peek-a-boo’ while reading. When caregivers evaluated learners’ basic parent-provider communication skills, all reported that the learners treated them with respect and used plain language. Discussion: Our curriculum extends beyond previous studies by measuring recommended books, anticipatory guidance, and communication skills using paediatric SPs and standardized patient caregivers. Curriculum activities can be tailored to best promote parent-provider literacy communication training in other programs.

AB - Background: Reach Out and Read promotes early literacy and school readiness by incorporating book delivery and anticipatory guidance into well-child visits. There is a need to train future healthcare providers in the knowledge and skills to communicate with parents/caregivers about early childhood literacy. We developed and evaluated a curriculum to improve learners’ knowledge, attitudes, and skills towards the incorporation of parent-provider literacy communication into well-child visits. Methods: Family medicine residents (n = 30), physician assistant students (n = 36), and medical students (n = 28) participated in a curriculum consisting of service learning, online didactic training, objective structured clinical exams (OSCEs) and a debriefing session. Standardized patients (SPs; 6 months to 5 years) and standardized patient caregivers were recruited and trained. Learners were evaluated on their abilities to offer books to patients, provide anticipatory guidance, and demonstrate parent-provider communication skills. Knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction were collected pre- and post-curriculum. Results: Significant increases in total knowledge were observed after completing curriculum activities (p < 0.001). All attitudes improved after training (p < 0.05). All learners (100%) recommended that caregivers talk back and forth with their 6‑ to 12-month-old babies and make eye contact. Few (18.2%) learners recommended playing games like ‘peek-a-boo’ while reading. When caregivers evaluated learners’ basic parent-provider communication skills, all reported that the learners treated them with respect and used plain language. Discussion: Our curriculum extends beyond previous studies by measuring recommended books, anticipatory guidance, and communication skills using paediatric SPs and standardized patient caregivers. Curriculum activities can be tailored to best promote parent-provider literacy communication training in other programs.

KW - Early childhood literacy

KW - Medical students

KW - Objective structured clinical exam

KW - Paediatrics

KW - Physician assistant

KW - Postgraduate

KW - Primary care

KW - Reach Out and Read

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85064552718&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85064552718&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s40037-019-0503-8

DO - 10.1007/s40037-019-0503-8

M3 - Article

C2 - 30912005

AN - SCOPUS:85064552718

VL - 8

SP - 110

EP - 117

JO - Perspectives on Medical Education

JF - Perspectives on Medical Education

SN - 2212-2761

IS - 2

ER -