Parental involvement and adolescents' diabetes management: The mediating role of self-efficacy and externalizing and internalizing behaviors

Cynthia A. Berg, Pamela S. King, Jorie M. Butler, Phung Pham, Debra Palmer, Deborah J. Wiebe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

69 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To examine mediating processes linking parental involvement to diabetes management (adherence and metabolic control) during adolescence. Methods: A total of 252 young adolescents (M age=12.49 years, SD=1.53, 53.6% females) with type 1 diabetes reported their parents' involvement in diabetes management (relationship quality, monitoring, and behavioral involvement), their own externalizing and internalizing behaviors, diabetes-self efficacy, and adherence behaviors. HbA1c was drawn from medical records. Results: SEM analyses indicated that the associations of mothers' and fathers' relationship quality with diabetes outcomes were mediated by adolescents' perceptions of self-efficacy and externalizing behaviors, and the associations of fathers' monitoring and behavioral involvement with adherence were partially mediated by adolescents' self-efficacy. There were also direct (non-mediated) associations between mothers' monitoring and adherence, and fathers' monitoring and adherence and metabolic control. Conclusions: Quality of the parent-adolescent relationship and monitoring are important for better adherence and metabolic control among adolescents through higher diabetes self-efficacy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)329-339
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Pediatric Psychology
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2011

Keywords

  • adherence
  • metabolic control
  • parental involvement
  • self-efficacy
  • type 1 diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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