Parents’ decontextualized talk during early childhood predicts the neural basis of narrative processing in later childhood

Özlem Ece Demir-Lira, Salomi S. Asaridou, Susan C. Levine, Susan Goldin-Meadow, Steven L. Small

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Early parental language input strongly predicts children's language development and academic success. Little is known about relations between early input and the neurobiology of language. Among different measures of input, parents' decontextualized utterances about abstract topics predict children's language outcomes more strongly than parental socioeconomic status and input quantity. Here, using fMRI, we show that preschool parental language input is associated with school-aged children recruiting different neurocognitive systems for language processing.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1767-1768
Number of pages2
JournalProceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS
Volume3
Issue number2018-June
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes
Event13th International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS 2018: Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age: Making the Learning Sciences Count - London, United Kingdom
Duration: Jun 23 2018Jun 27 2018

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parents
childhood
narrative
Processing
language
academic success
neurosciences
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neurobiology
social status
school

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science (miscellaneous)
  • Education

Cite this

Parents’ decontextualized talk during early childhood predicts the neural basis of narrative processing in later childhood. / Demir-Lira, Özlem Ece; Asaridou, Salomi S.; Levine, Susan C.; Goldin-Meadow, Susan; Small, Steven L.

In: Proceedings of International Conference of the Learning Sciences, ICLS, Vol. 3, No. 2018-June, 01.01.2018, p. 1767-1768.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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