Patterns of use and public perception of over-the-counter pain relievers

Focus on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

C. Mel Wilcox, Byron Cryer, George Triadafilopoulos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

158 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To assess the frequency and indications for over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) use and to what degree the public is aware of their side effects. Methods. Two surveys totaling 9062 respondents were performed of the American public. The Roper survey, conducted in 1997, and the National Consumers League (NCL) survey, conducted in December 2002, were intended primarily to assess the public's use of and attitudes toward NSAID and OTC analgesics. Results. Ibuprofen based drugs were the most frequently used OTC in both surveys (57% Roper, 33% NCL). In the Roper survey, 17% of respondents used NSAID, with 38% using both prescription and OTC. Forty-six percent of exclusive OTC users believed OTC were safer, while 56% of exclusive users of prescription NSAID believed they were safer. Sixty percent and 29% of exclusive OTC users were neither aware of nor believed they were at risk for side effects from NSAID, respectively. Twenty-six percent of respondents used more than the recommended dose on the label, while 22% believed warning symptoms would always precede any NSAID induced complications. In the NCL survey, 83% had used an OTC agent in the last year, with 15% reporting daily use, and 49% were not concerned about potential side effects. In this survey, 30% believed there was less risk with OTC analgesics, and 44% consumed more than the recommended dosage on the label. Conclusion. OTC analgesics including NSAID are widely used, are frequently taken inappropriately and potentially dangerously, and users are generally unaware of the potential for adverse side effects. Educational intervention directed toward both patients and physicians appears warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2218-2224
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume32
Issue number11
StatePublished - Nov 2005

Fingerprint

Anti-Inflammatory Agents
Pain
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Analgesics
Prescriptions
Surveys and Questionnaires
Nonprescription Drugs
Ibuprofen
Physicians

Keywords

  • Acetaminophen
  • Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs
  • Over the counter drugs
  • Pain relievers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Patterns of use and public perception of over-the-counter pain relievers : Focus on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. / Wilcox, C. Mel; Cryer, Byron; Triadafilopoulos, George.

In: Journal of Rheumatology, Vol. 32, No. 11, 11.2005, p. 2218-2224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9c1120fb86204d86af178df162ca8351,
title = "Patterns of use and public perception of over-the-counter pain relievers: Focus on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs",
abstract = "Objective. To assess the frequency and indications for over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) use and to what degree the public is aware of their side effects. Methods. Two surveys totaling 9062 respondents were performed of the American public. The Roper survey, conducted in 1997, and the National Consumers League (NCL) survey, conducted in December 2002, were intended primarily to assess the public's use of and attitudes toward NSAID and OTC analgesics. Results. Ibuprofen based drugs were the most frequently used OTC in both surveys (57{\%} Roper, 33{\%} NCL). In the Roper survey, 17{\%} of respondents used NSAID, with 38{\%} using both prescription and OTC. Forty-six percent of exclusive OTC users believed OTC were safer, while 56{\%} of exclusive users of prescription NSAID believed they were safer. Sixty percent and 29{\%} of exclusive OTC users were neither aware of nor believed they were at risk for side effects from NSAID, respectively. Twenty-six percent of respondents used more than the recommended dose on the label, while 22{\%} believed warning symptoms would always precede any NSAID induced complications. In the NCL survey, 83{\%} had used an OTC agent in the last year, with 15{\%} reporting daily use, and 49{\%} were not concerned about potential side effects. In this survey, 30{\%} believed there was less risk with OTC analgesics, and 44{\%} consumed more than the recommended dosage on the label. Conclusion. OTC analgesics including NSAID are widely used, are frequently taken inappropriately and potentially dangerously, and users are generally unaware of the potential for adverse side effects. Educational intervention directed toward both patients and physicians appears warranted.",
keywords = "Acetaminophen, Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, Over the counter drugs, Pain relievers",
author = "Wilcox, {C. Mel} and Byron Cryer and George Triadafilopoulos",
year = "2005",
month = "11",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "2218--2224",
journal = "Journal of Rheumatology",
issn = "0315-162X",
publisher = "Journal of Rheumatology",
number = "11",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns of use and public perception of over-the-counter pain relievers

T2 - Focus on nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

AU - Wilcox, C. Mel

AU - Cryer, Byron

AU - Triadafilopoulos, George

PY - 2005/11

Y1 - 2005/11

N2 - Objective. To assess the frequency and indications for over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) use and to what degree the public is aware of their side effects. Methods. Two surveys totaling 9062 respondents were performed of the American public. The Roper survey, conducted in 1997, and the National Consumers League (NCL) survey, conducted in December 2002, were intended primarily to assess the public's use of and attitudes toward NSAID and OTC analgesics. Results. Ibuprofen based drugs were the most frequently used OTC in both surveys (57% Roper, 33% NCL). In the Roper survey, 17% of respondents used NSAID, with 38% using both prescription and OTC. Forty-six percent of exclusive OTC users believed OTC were safer, while 56% of exclusive users of prescription NSAID believed they were safer. Sixty percent and 29% of exclusive OTC users were neither aware of nor believed they were at risk for side effects from NSAID, respectively. Twenty-six percent of respondents used more than the recommended dose on the label, while 22% believed warning symptoms would always precede any NSAID induced complications. In the NCL survey, 83% had used an OTC agent in the last year, with 15% reporting daily use, and 49% were not concerned about potential side effects. In this survey, 30% believed there was less risk with OTC analgesics, and 44% consumed more than the recommended dosage on the label. Conclusion. OTC analgesics including NSAID are widely used, are frequently taken inappropriately and potentially dangerously, and users are generally unaware of the potential for adverse side effects. Educational intervention directed toward both patients and physicians appears warranted.

AB - Objective. To assess the frequency and indications for over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) use and to what degree the public is aware of their side effects. Methods. Two surveys totaling 9062 respondents were performed of the American public. The Roper survey, conducted in 1997, and the National Consumers League (NCL) survey, conducted in December 2002, were intended primarily to assess the public's use of and attitudes toward NSAID and OTC analgesics. Results. Ibuprofen based drugs were the most frequently used OTC in both surveys (57% Roper, 33% NCL). In the Roper survey, 17% of respondents used NSAID, with 38% using both prescription and OTC. Forty-six percent of exclusive OTC users believed OTC were safer, while 56% of exclusive users of prescription NSAID believed they were safer. Sixty percent and 29% of exclusive OTC users were neither aware of nor believed they were at risk for side effects from NSAID, respectively. Twenty-six percent of respondents used more than the recommended dose on the label, while 22% believed warning symptoms would always precede any NSAID induced complications. In the NCL survey, 83% had used an OTC agent in the last year, with 15% reporting daily use, and 49% were not concerned about potential side effects. In this survey, 30% believed there was less risk with OTC analgesics, and 44% consumed more than the recommended dosage on the label. Conclusion. OTC analgesics including NSAID are widely used, are frequently taken inappropriately and potentially dangerously, and users are generally unaware of the potential for adverse side effects. Educational intervention directed toward both patients and physicians appears warranted.

KW - Acetaminophen

KW - Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs

KW - Over the counter drugs

KW - Pain relievers

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=27744449725&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=27744449725&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 32

SP - 2218

EP - 2224

JO - Journal of Rheumatology

JF - Journal of Rheumatology

SN - 0315-162X

IS - 11

ER -