Pelvic Organ Prolapse Surgery in Academic Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery Urology Practice in the Setting of the Food and Drug Administration Public Health Notifications

Austin Younger, Goran Rac, J. Quentin Clemens, Kathleen Kobashi, Aqsa Khan, Victor Nitti, Ilana Jacobs, Gary E. Lemack, Elizabeth T. Brown, Roger Dmochowski, Lara Maclachlan, Arthur Mourtzinos, David Ginsberg, Michelle Koski, Ross Rames, Eric Rovner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To understand the effect of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) public health notifications regarding transvaginal placement of surgical mesh for pelvic organ prolapsed (POP) on surgeon practice patterns in tertiary care academic medical centers. Materials and Methods Surgical volume for procedures performed primarily by fellowship trained Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery at a sampling of 8 academic institutions across the US were collected using current procedural technology codes for POP repair and revision surgeries from 2007 to 2013. SAS statistical software was used to analyze data for trends and to assess differences in number of procedures across years by performing Spearman correlation analysis and Pearson's chi-squared test. Significance of trend was defined as P <.05 for both analysis methods. Results There has been a substantial reduction in transvaginal mesh-augmented repair of POP since the FDA warning statements of 2008 and 2011. Mesh revision surgery has increased over this same period. However, the total number of interventions for POP has remained stable over the study period. Abdominal sacrocolpopexy has increased as a whole but represents only a small percentage of total cases. Conclusion Surgical correction of POP comprises a large portion of Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery practice that continues to evolve in the aftermath of the FDA public health notifications. The utilization of transvaginal placement of surgical mesh augmented POP repair has decreased among practicing urologists at a sampling of academic institutions across the United States. Indications for surgery, complications, and outcomes were not evaluated during this retrospective study; however, such data may provide alternative insights into the reasons for the observed trends.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)46-51
Number of pages6
JournalUrology
Volume91
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2016

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

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    Younger, A., Rac, G., Clemens, J. Q., Kobashi, K., Khan, A., Nitti, V., Jacobs, I., Lemack, G. E., Brown, E. T., Dmochowski, R., Maclachlan, L., Mourtzinos, A., Ginsberg, D., Koski, M., Rames, R., & Rovner, E. (2016). Pelvic Organ Prolapse Surgery in Academic Female Pelvic Medicine and Reconstructive Surgery Urology Practice in the Setting of the Food and Drug Administration Public Health Notifications. Urology, 91, 46-51. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.urology.2015.12.057