Phase I studies of continuous-infusion paclitaxel given with standard aggressive radiation therapy for locally advanced solid tumors

D. I. Rosenthal, L. G. Close, J. A. Lucci, S. C. Schold, J. Truelson, H. Fathallah-Skaykh, B. Kamen, F. M. Vultch, A. F. Gazdar, J. Griener, M. Landay, D. Mendelsohn, J. Tourville, P. Rogers, K. Y. Orr, J. McWhorter, D. P. Carbone

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Currently available therapies are unsatisfactory for locally advanced solid tumors of the lung, head and neck, and brain. Laboratory data suggest that the addition of paclitaxel (Taxol; Bristol-Myers Squibb Oncology, Princeton, NJ), a microtubule-stabilizing drug, to radiation therapy may result in significant radiation sensitization, perhaps because paclitaxel induces cell cycle arrest at G2/M. Relatively low concentrations, 1 to 10 nmol/L, appear to be optimal for direct cytotoxicity and radiosensitization in vitro. Within this dose range, more prolonged exposure seems to result in higher response rates. We are conducting phase I trials designed to test continuous infusion (24 hours per day, 7 days per week) intravenous paclitaxel combined with standard curative-intent radiation therapy. To date, 22 patients are evaluable, and the maximum tolerated dose of paclitaxel has not been reached at up to 2.5 mg/m2/d. Observed toxicities include anemia, lymphopenia, mucositis, and cutaneous erythema/desquamation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-17
Number of pages5
JournalSeminars in oncology
Volume22
Issue number4 SUPPL. 9
StatePublished - 1995

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

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