Phosphorylation of the TAL1 Oncoprotein by the Extracellular-Signal-Regulated Protein Kinase ERK1

Jiin Tsuey Cheng, Melanie H. Cobb, Richard Baer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Alteration of the TAL1 gene is the most common genetic lesion found in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. TAL1 encodes phosphoproteins, pp42TAL1 and pp22TAL1, that represent phosphorylated versions of the full-length (residues 1 to 331) and truncated (residues 176 to 331) TAL1 gene products, respectively. Both proteins contain the basic helix-loop-helix motif, a DNA-binding and protein dimerization motif common to several known transcriptional regulatory factors. We now report that serine residue 122 (S122) is a major phosphorylation site of pp42TAL1 in leukemic cell lines and transfected COS1 cells. In vivo phosphorylation of S122 is induced by epidermal growth factor with a rapid time course that parallels activation of the ERK/MAP2 protein kinases. Moreover, S122 is readily phosphorylated in vitro by the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK1. These data suggest that TAL1 residue S122 serves as an in vivo substrate for ERK/MAP2 kinases such as ERK1. Therefore, S122 phosphorylation may provide a mechanism whereby the properties of TAL1 polypeptides can be modulated by extracellular stimuli.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)801-808
Number of pages8
JournalMolecular and Cellular Biology
Volume13
Issue number2
StatePublished - Feb 1993

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Oncogene Proteins
Extracellular Signal-Regulated MAP Kinases
Protein Kinases
Serine
Phosphorylation
Helix-Loop-Helix Motifs
Protein Multimerization
Precursor T-Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma
Amino Acid Motifs
Phosphoproteins
DNA-Binding Proteins
Epidermal Growth Factor
Genes
Phosphotransferases
Cell Line
Peptides
Proteins

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Genetics
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Phosphorylation of the TAL1 Oncoprotein by the Extracellular-Signal-Regulated Protein Kinase ERK1. / Cheng, Jiin Tsuey; Cobb, Melanie H.; Baer, Richard.

In: Molecular and Cellular Biology, Vol. 13, No. 2, 02.1993, p. 801-808.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Alteration of the TAL1 gene is the most common genetic lesion found in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. TAL1 encodes phosphoproteins, pp42TAL1 and pp22TAL1, that represent phosphorylated versions of the full-length (residues 1 to 331) and truncated (residues 176 to 331) TAL1 gene products, respectively. Both proteins contain the basic helix-loop-helix motif, a DNA-binding and protein dimerization motif common to several known transcriptional regulatory factors. We now report that serine residue 122 (S122) is a major phosphorylation site of pp42TAL1 in leukemic cell lines and transfected COS1 cells. In vivo phosphorylation of S122 is induced by epidermal growth factor with a rapid time course that parallels activation of the ERK/MAP2 protein kinases. Moreover, S122 is readily phosphorylated in vitro by the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase ERK1. These data suggest that TAL1 residue S122 serves as an in vivo substrate for ERK/MAP2 kinases such as ERK1. Therefore, S122 phosphorylation may provide a mechanism whereby the properties of TAL1 polypeptides can be modulated by extracellular stimuli.

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