Physical activity, change in biomarkers of myocardial stress and injury, and subsequent heart failure risk in older adults

Christopher R. Defilippi, James A de Lemos, Andrew T. Tkaczuk, Robert H. Christenson, Mercedes R. Carnethon, David S. Siscovick, John S. Gottdiener, Stephen L. Seliger

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76 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between physical activity and changes in levels of highly sensitive troponin T (cTnT) and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), and the subsequent risk of the development of heart failure (HF) in community-dwelling older adults. Background: Higher baseline levels of cTnT and NT-proBNP and increases over time correlate with the risk of HF in older adults. Factors modifying these levels have not been identified. Methods: NT-proBNP and cTnT were measured at baseline and 2 to 3 years later in adults 65 years of age and older free of HF participating in the Cardiovascular Health Study. Self-reported physical activity and walking pace were combined into a composite score. An increase was prespecified for NT-proBNP as a >25% increment from baseline to ≥190 pg/ml and for cTnT as a >50% increment from baseline in participants with detectable levels (≥3 pg/ml). Results: A total of 2,933 participants free of HF had NT-proBNP and cTnT measured at both time points. The probability of an increase in biomarker concentrations between baseline and follow-up visits was inversely related to the physical activity score. Compared with participants with the lowest score, those with the highest score had an odds ratio of 0.50 (95% confidence interval: 0.33 to 0.77) for an increase in NT-proBNP and an odds ratio of 0.30 (95% confidence interval: 0.16 to 0.55) for an increase in cTnT, after adjusting for comorbidities and baseline levels. A higher activity score associated with a lower long-term incidence of HF. Moreover, at each level of activity, an increase in either biomarker still identified those at higher risk. Conclusions: These findings suggest that moderate physical activity has protective effects on early heart failure phenotypes, preventing cardiac injury and neurohormonal activation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2539-2547
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume60
Issue number24
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 18 2012

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Keywords

  • aging
  • exercise
  • heart failure
  • natriuretic peptides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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