Popliteal vein repair may not impact amputation rates in combined popliteal artery and vein injury

Anahita Dua, Sapan S. Desai, Fadwa Ali, Kai Yang, Cheong Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

Introduction: This study aimed to determine the incidence, management, and outcomes of popliteal artery injury, popliteal vein injury, and concomitant popliteal artery injury and vein injury. Methods: A retrospective analysis was completed using the 2000–2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample utilizing International Classification of Diseases-9 codes to select patients with isolated popliteal artery injury (904.41), isolated popliteal vein injury (904.42), and isolated concomitant popliteal artery and vein injury (958.92). Variables included demographics, procedure type, and outcome during hospital course. Statistical analysis was with chi-square, Fisher exact test, and multivariate analysis. Results: A total of 2216 patients presented with injury to the popliteal system; 71% (1568) presented with isolated popliteal artery injury, 14% (306) with isolated popliteal vein injury, and 15% (342) with concomitant popliteal artery and vein injury. Amputation was significantly increased in popliteal artery injury and concomitant popliteal artery and vein injury (P 0.001) as compared to popliteal vein injury. Ligation of the vein was more common in concomitant popliteal artery and vein injury when compared to popliteal vein injury (P 0.05). The rate of amputation was 9.8% for popliteal artery injury, significantly greater than for popliteal vein injury (0.7%, P 0.001) but not different than for concomitant popliteal artery and vein injury (8.2%, P = NS). Conclusion: Evidence-based management of popliteal vasculature may increase rates of limb salvage. Within the limitations of the data set used, conclusions appear to be that patients with popliteal vein injury or concomitant popliteal artery and vein injury may be managed with vein ligation without increased amputation rates as compared to popliteal artery injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)166-170
Number of pages5
JournalVascular
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Popliteal injury
  • popliteal trauma
  • revascularization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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