Prevalence, incidence and stability of drinking problems among Whites, Blacks and Hispanics

1984-1992

Raul Caetano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: This article reports on the prevalence, incidence and stability of dependence-related problems and social consequences from drinking among whites, blacks and Hispanics between 1984 and 1992. Method: A probability sample of 1,777 whites, 1,947 blacks and 1,453 Hispanics from the U.S. adult household population was interviewed in 1984. In 1992 a subsample consisting of 788 whites, 723 blacks and 703 Hispanics was reinterviewed. Interviews averaging 1 hour in length were conducted in respondents' homes by trained interviewers. Results: The prevalence of a number of alcohol-related problems, the stability and incidence of dependence-related problems and the incidence of social consequences from drinking are higher among Hispanic than among white men. Dependence-related problems are more stable among black than among white men. Among women, the incidence of dependence-related problems and social consequences from drinking is higher among blacks than whites. Hispanic women have a higher incidence of social consequences from drinking than white women. Having a problem at Time 1 correlates only moderately with having a problem at Time 2, independent of ethnicity. Conclusions: In general, Hispanics and blacks continue to be more at risk than whites for developing a number of alcohol-related problems. These two ethnic groups should be the focus of renewed efforts to address alcohol problems and inequalities in income distribution, employment, education and lack of access to adequate health care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)565-572
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Studies on Alcohol
Volume58
Issue number6
StatePublished - Nov 1997

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Hispanic Americans
Drinking
incidence
Alcohols
Social Problems
Incidence
social effects
Health care
Education
alcohol
Interviews
Sampling Studies
Health Services Accessibility
Ethnic Groups
hydroquinone
income distribution
interview
ethnic group
ethnicity
health care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Prevalence, incidence and stability of drinking problems among Whites, Blacks and Hispanics : 1984-1992. / Caetano, Raul.

In: Journal of Studies on Alcohol, Vol. 58, No. 6, 11.1997, p. 565-572.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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