Prevalence of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care unit patients: Results from the first national point-prevalence survey

Annette H. Sohn, Denise O. Garrett, Ronda L. Sinkowitz-Cochran, Lisa A. Grohskopf, Gail L. Levine, Beth H. Stover, Jane D. Siegel, William R. Jarvis

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293 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Patients admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are at high risk of nosocomial infection. We conducted a national multicenter assessment of nosocomial infections in NICUs to determine the prevalence of infections, describe associated risk factors, and help focus prevention efforts. Study design: We conducted a point prevalence survey of nosocomial infections in 29 Pediatric Prevention Network NICUs. Patients present on the survey date were included. Data were collected on underlying diagnoses, therapeutic interventions/treatments, infections, and outcomes. Results: Of the 827 patients surveyed, 94 (11.4%) had 116 NICU-acquired infections: bloodstream (52.6%), lower respiratory tract (12.9%), ear-nose-throat (8.6%), or urinary tract infections (8.6%). Infants with infections were of significantly lower birth weight (median 1006 g [range 441 to 4460 g] vs 1589 g [range 326 to 5480 g]; P < .001) and had longer median durations of stay than those without infections (88 days [range 8 to 279 days] vs 32 days [range 1 to 483 days]; P < .001). Most common pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci and enterococci. Patients with central intravascular catheters (relative risk = 3.81, CI 2.32-6.25; P < .001) or receiving total parenteral nutrition (relative risk = 5.72, CI 3.45-9.49; P < .001) were at greater risk of bloodstream infection. Conclusions: This study documents the high prevalence of nosocomial infections in patients in NICUs and the urgent need for more effective prevention interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)821-827
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume139
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001

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Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Cross Infection
Infection
Total Parenteral Nutrition
Coagulase
Enterococcus
Pharynx
Staphylococcus
Nose
Birth Weight
Urinary Tract Infections
Respiratory System
Ear
Surveys and Questionnaires
Catheters
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Sohn, A. H., Garrett, D. O., Sinkowitz-Cochran, R. L., Grohskopf, L. A., Levine, G. L., Stover, B. H., ... Jarvis, W. R. (2001). Prevalence of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care unit patients: Results from the first national point-prevalence survey. Journal of Pediatrics, 139(6), 821-827. https://doi.org/10.1067/mpd.2001.119442

Prevalence of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care unit patients : Results from the first national point-prevalence survey. / Sohn, Annette H.; Garrett, Denise O.; Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda L.; Grohskopf, Lisa A.; Levine, Gail L.; Stover, Beth H.; Siegel, Jane D.; Jarvis, William R.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 139, No. 6, 2001, p. 821-827.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sohn, AH, Garrett, DO, Sinkowitz-Cochran, RL, Grohskopf, LA, Levine, GL, Stover, BH, Siegel, JD & Jarvis, WR 2001, 'Prevalence of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care unit patients: Results from the first national point-prevalence survey', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 139, no. 6, pp. 821-827. https://doi.org/10.1067/mpd.2001.119442
Sohn, Annette H. ; Garrett, Denise O. ; Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda L. ; Grohskopf, Lisa A. ; Levine, Gail L. ; Stover, Beth H. ; Siegel, Jane D. ; Jarvis, William R. / Prevalence of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care unit patients : Results from the first national point-prevalence survey. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2001 ; Vol. 139, No. 6. pp. 821-827.
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abstract = "Objectives: Patients admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are at high risk of nosocomial infection. We conducted a national multicenter assessment of nosocomial infections in NICUs to determine the prevalence of infections, describe associated risk factors, and help focus prevention efforts. Study design: We conducted a point prevalence survey of nosocomial infections in 29 Pediatric Prevention Network NICUs. Patients present on the survey date were included. Data were collected on underlying diagnoses, therapeutic interventions/treatments, infections, and outcomes. Results: Of the 827 patients surveyed, 94 (11.4{\%}) had 116 NICU-acquired infections: bloodstream (52.6{\%}), lower respiratory tract (12.9{\%}), ear-nose-throat (8.6{\%}), or urinary tract infections (8.6{\%}). Infants with infections were of significantly lower birth weight (median 1006 g [range 441 to 4460 g] vs 1589 g [range 326 to 5480 g]; P < .001) and had longer median durations of stay than those without infections (88 days [range 8 to 279 days] vs 32 days [range 1 to 483 days]; P < .001). Most common pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci and enterococci. Patients with central intravascular catheters (relative risk = 3.81, CI 2.32-6.25; P < .001) or receiving total parenteral nutrition (relative risk = 5.72, CI 3.45-9.49; P < .001) were at greater risk of bloodstream infection. Conclusions: This study documents the high prevalence of nosocomial infections in patients in NICUs and the urgent need for more effective prevention interventions.",
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T2 - Results from the first national point-prevalence survey

AU - Sohn, Annette H.

AU - Garrett, Denise O.

AU - Sinkowitz-Cochran, Ronda L.

AU - Grohskopf, Lisa A.

AU - Levine, Gail L.

AU - Stover, Beth H.

AU - Siegel, Jane D.

AU - Jarvis, William R.

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N2 - Objectives: Patients admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are at high risk of nosocomial infection. We conducted a national multicenter assessment of nosocomial infections in NICUs to determine the prevalence of infections, describe associated risk factors, and help focus prevention efforts. Study design: We conducted a point prevalence survey of nosocomial infections in 29 Pediatric Prevention Network NICUs. Patients present on the survey date were included. Data were collected on underlying diagnoses, therapeutic interventions/treatments, infections, and outcomes. Results: Of the 827 patients surveyed, 94 (11.4%) had 116 NICU-acquired infections: bloodstream (52.6%), lower respiratory tract (12.9%), ear-nose-throat (8.6%), or urinary tract infections (8.6%). Infants with infections were of significantly lower birth weight (median 1006 g [range 441 to 4460 g] vs 1589 g [range 326 to 5480 g]; P < .001) and had longer median durations of stay than those without infections (88 days [range 8 to 279 days] vs 32 days [range 1 to 483 days]; P < .001). Most common pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci and enterococci. Patients with central intravascular catheters (relative risk = 3.81, CI 2.32-6.25; P < .001) or receiving total parenteral nutrition (relative risk = 5.72, CI 3.45-9.49; P < .001) were at greater risk of bloodstream infection. Conclusions: This study documents the high prevalence of nosocomial infections in patients in NICUs and the urgent need for more effective prevention interventions.

AB - Objectives: Patients admitted to neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are at high risk of nosocomial infection. We conducted a national multicenter assessment of nosocomial infections in NICUs to determine the prevalence of infections, describe associated risk factors, and help focus prevention efforts. Study design: We conducted a point prevalence survey of nosocomial infections in 29 Pediatric Prevention Network NICUs. Patients present on the survey date were included. Data were collected on underlying diagnoses, therapeutic interventions/treatments, infections, and outcomes. Results: Of the 827 patients surveyed, 94 (11.4%) had 116 NICU-acquired infections: bloodstream (52.6%), lower respiratory tract (12.9%), ear-nose-throat (8.6%), or urinary tract infections (8.6%). Infants with infections were of significantly lower birth weight (median 1006 g [range 441 to 4460 g] vs 1589 g [range 326 to 5480 g]; P < .001) and had longer median durations of stay than those without infections (88 days [range 8 to 279 days] vs 32 days [range 1 to 483 days]; P < .001). Most common pathogens were coagulase-negative staphylococci and enterococci. Patients with central intravascular catheters (relative risk = 3.81, CI 2.32-6.25; P < .001) or receiving total parenteral nutrition (relative risk = 5.72, CI 3.45-9.49; P < .001) were at greater risk of bloodstream infection. Conclusions: This study documents the high prevalence of nosocomial infections in patients in NICUs and the urgent need for more effective prevention interventions.

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