Primary CNS lymphoma

E. A. Maher, H. A. Fine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) is seen with increasing frequency in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients. Radiation therapy has historically been standard treatment for this disease, resulting in complete remissions in the majority of patients, but with most patients relapsing and dying of the disease in less than 2 years. The use of chemotherapy appears to be changing the natural history of this tumor, with significantly prolonged survival in some groups of patients. The optimal agents, doses, schedules, routes of administration, and need for radiation therapy, however, remain undefined. In this review, some of the questions regarding the management of PCNSL are addressed and recommendations are made regarding the design of future regimens.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)346-356
Number of pages11
JournalSeminars in Oncology
Volume26
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1999

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Lymphoma
Radiotherapy
Immunocompromised Host
Appointments and Schedules
Drug Therapy
Survival
Neoplasms
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

Maher, E. A., & Fine, H. A. (1999). Primary CNS lymphoma. Seminars in Oncology, 26(3), 346-356.

Primary CNS lymphoma. / Maher, E. A.; Fine, H. A.

In: Seminars in Oncology, Vol. 26, No. 3, 1999, p. 346-356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Maher, EA & Fine, HA 1999, 'Primary CNS lymphoma', Seminars in Oncology, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 346-356.
Maher EA, Fine HA. Primary CNS lymphoma. Seminars in Oncology. 1999;26(3):346-356.
Maher, E. A. ; Fine, H. A. / Primary CNS lymphoma. In: Seminars in Oncology. 1999 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 346-356.
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