Primary hyperparathyroidism surgical management since the introduction of minimally invasive parathyroidectorny: Mayo clinic experience

Clive S. Grant, Geoffrey Thompson, David Farley, Jon Van Heerden, Richard Prinz, John Ryan, Fiemu Nwariaku

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

215 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hypothesis: Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) for primary hyperparathyroidism (HPT) has equal cure and recurrence rates as standard cervical exploration. Changes in the management of primary HPT have occurred since introducing MIP including localization, anesthesia, intraoperative parathyroid hormone monitoring, and indications for parathyroidectomy. Design: Cohort analysis of 1361 consecutive patients with primary HPT operated on at the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn, from June 1998 through March 2004. Mean follow-up, 25 months. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Patients: One thousand three hundred sixty-one patients operated on for primary HPT, excluding 160 patients who were reoperated on. Intervention: Standard cervical exploration MIP. Main Outcome Measures: Cure, recurrence, localization, anesthesia, hospitalization, intraoperative parathyroid hormone level monitoring, contraindications to MIP, surgical indications, assessment of osteoporosis and osteopenia, postoperative patient assessment of general patient health, and operative satisfaction. Results: Cure of primary HPT for both conventional exploration and MIP was 97%; only 1 patient who underwent MIP had a potential recurrence. Imaging sensitivity and positive predictive values were as follows: sestamibi scintigraphy, 86% and 93%; ultrasonography, 61% and 87%, respectively. Usage of general vs local anesthesia with intravenous sedation was 46% and 49%, respectively, in patients who underwent MIP; 46% were dismissed as outpatients, 49% had single-night stays. The accuracy of intraoperative parathyroid hormone level monitoring was as follows: 98% (8% had true-negative results); the frequency of multiple gland disease was 13%. Accounting for causes precluding MIP, an estimated 60% to 70% of all patients would be eligible for MIP. By preoperative assessment, 79% had osteoporosis-osteopenia; 58% with postoperative bone mineral density measurements were improved. More than 85% were satisfied with the results of their operation. Conclusion: With high-quality localization and intraoperative parathyroid hormone level monitoring, MIP can be performed with equal cure rates as standard cervical exploration, with no present evidence of delayed recurrence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)472-479
Number of pages8
JournalArchives of Surgery
Volume140
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2005

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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