Prostate-specific antigen screening among young men in the United States

Charles D. Scales, Jodi Antonelli, Lesley H. Curtis, Kevin A. Schulman, Judd W. Moul

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Disagreement exists on the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests for cancer-risk stratification in young men in the United States. Little is known about the use of PSA testing in these men. To understand policy implications of risk stratification, the authors sought to characterize PSA use among young men. METHODS. The authors used the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to study prostate-cancer screening in a representative sample of men aged 40 years and older (n = 58,511). The primary outcome was self-report of a PSA test in the previous year. RESULTS. Among men aged 40 to 49 years, 22.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.5-23.5) reported having had a PSA test in the previous year, compared with 53.7% (95% CI, 52.8-54.7; P < .001) of men aged ≥50 years. When sociodemographic characteristics were statistically controlled, young, black, non-Hispanic men were more likely than young, white, non-Hispanic men to report having had a PSA test in the previous year (odds ratio [OR), 2.42; 95% CI, 1.95-3.01; P <.001). In young men, annual household income ≥$35,000 (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.26-1.78; P <.001) and an ongoing relationship with a physician (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 2.06-3.07; P < .001) were associated with PSA testing. CONCLUSIONS. One-fifth of young men reported having had a PSA test within the previous year. Young, black, non-Hispanic men are more likely than young, white, non-Hispanic men to report having had a PSA test, although screening in this high-risk group remains suboptimal. Cancer Society.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1315-1323
Number of pages9
JournalCancer
Volume113
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2008

Fingerprint

Prostate-Specific Antigen
Confidence Intervals
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Early Detection of Cancer
Self Report
Neoplasms
Prostatic Neoplasms
Odds Ratio
Physicians

Keywords

  • Age factors
  • Mass screening
  • Prostate-specific antigen
  • Prostatic neoplasms
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Scales, C. D., Antonelli, J., Curtis, L. H., Schulman, K. A., & Moul, J. W. (2008). Prostate-specific antigen screening among young men in the United States. Cancer, 113(6), 1315-1323. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23667

Prostate-specific antigen screening among young men in the United States. / Scales, Charles D.; Antonelli, Jodi; Curtis, Lesley H.; Schulman, Kevin A.; Moul, Judd W.

In: Cancer, Vol. 113, No. 6, 15.09.2008, p. 1315-1323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scales, CD, Antonelli, J, Curtis, LH, Schulman, KA & Moul, JW 2008, 'Prostate-specific antigen screening among young men in the United States', Cancer, vol. 113, no. 6, pp. 1315-1323. https://doi.org/10.1002/cncr.23667
Scales, Charles D. ; Antonelli, Jodi ; Curtis, Lesley H. ; Schulman, Kevin A. ; Moul, Judd W. / Prostate-specific antigen screening among young men in the United States. In: Cancer. 2008 ; Vol. 113, No. 6. pp. 1315-1323.
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abstract = "Disagreement exists on the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests for cancer-risk stratification in young men in the United States. Little is known about the use of PSA testing in these men. To understand policy implications of risk stratification, the authors sought to characterize PSA use among young men. METHODS. The authors used the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to study prostate-cancer screening in a representative sample of men aged 40 years and older (n = 58,511). The primary outcome was self-report of a PSA test in the previous year. RESULTS. Among men aged 40 to 49 years, 22.5{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [CI], 21.5-23.5) reported having had a PSA test in the previous year, compared with 53.7{\%} (95{\%} CI, 52.8-54.7; P < .001) of men aged ≥50 years. When sociodemographic characteristics were statistically controlled, young, black, non-Hispanic men were more likely than young, white, non-Hispanic men to report having had a PSA test in the previous year (odds ratio [OR), 2.42; 95{\%} CI, 1.95-3.01; P <.001). In young men, annual household income ≥$35,000 (OR, 1.50; 95{\%} CI, 1.26-1.78; P <.001) and an ongoing relationship with a physician (OR, 2.52; 95{\%} CI, 2.06-3.07; P < .001) were associated with PSA testing. CONCLUSIONS. One-fifth of young men reported having had a PSA test within the previous year. Young, black, non-Hispanic men are more likely than young, white, non-Hispanic men to report having had a PSA test, although screening in this high-risk group remains suboptimal. Cancer Society.",
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AU - Scales, Charles D.

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AU - Schulman, Kevin A.

AU - Moul, Judd W.

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N2 - Disagreement exists on the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests for cancer-risk stratification in young men in the United States. Little is known about the use of PSA testing in these men. To understand policy implications of risk stratification, the authors sought to characterize PSA use among young men. METHODS. The authors used the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to study prostate-cancer screening in a representative sample of men aged 40 years and older (n = 58,511). The primary outcome was self-report of a PSA test in the previous year. RESULTS. Among men aged 40 to 49 years, 22.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.5-23.5) reported having had a PSA test in the previous year, compared with 53.7% (95% CI, 52.8-54.7; P < .001) of men aged ≥50 years. When sociodemographic characteristics were statistically controlled, young, black, non-Hispanic men were more likely than young, white, non-Hispanic men to report having had a PSA test in the previous year (odds ratio [OR), 2.42; 95% CI, 1.95-3.01; P <.001). In young men, annual household income ≥$35,000 (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.26-1.78; P <.001) and an ongoing relationship with a physician (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 2.06-3.07; P < .001) were associated with PSA testing. CONCLUSIONS. One-fifth of young men reported having had a PSA test within the previous year. Young, black, non-Hispanic men are more likely than young, white, non-Hispanic men to report having had a PSA test, although screening in this high-risk group remains suboptimal. Cancer Society.

AB - Disagreement exists on the use of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) tests for cancer-risk stratification in young men in the United States. Little is known about the use of PSA testing in these men. To understand policy implications of risk stratification, the authors sought to characterize PSA use among young men. METHODS. The authors used the 2002 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System to study prostate-cancer screening in a representative sample of men aged 40 years and older (n = 58,511). The primary outcome was self-report of a PSA test in the previous year. RESULTS. Among men aged 40 to 49 years, 22.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.5-23.5) reported having had a PSA test in the previous year, compared with 53.7% (95% CI, 52.8-54.7; P < .001) of men aged ≥50 years. When sociodemographic characteristics were statistically controlled, young, black, non-Hispanic men were more likely than young, white, non-Hispanic men to report having had a PSA test in the previous year (odds ratio [OR), 2.42; 95% CI, 1.95-3.01; P <.001). In young men, annual household income ≥$35,000 (OR, 1.50; 95% CI, 1.26-1.78; P <.001) and an ongoing relationship with a physician (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 2.06-3.07; P < .001) were associated with PSA testing. CONCLUSIONS. One-fifth of young men reported having had a PSA test within the previous year. Young, black, non-Hispanic men are more likely than young, white, non-Hispanic men to report having had a PSA test, although screening in this high-risk group remains suboptimal. Cancer Society.

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KW - Risk factors

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