Psychiatric training program engagement with the pharmaceutical industry

An educational issue, not strictly an ethical one

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To analyze the educational and ethical issues involved in interactions between departments of psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry. Methods: The author analyzes the history of attitudes toward pharmaceutical companies, various conflicting ethical principles that apply, and areas of confluence and conflict of interest between psychiatric education and the drug industry. These attitudes are applied to a variety of specific types of interactions with representatives of the pharmaceutical industry. Results: A number of forms of interaction are found to be on balance, ethical, and productive, while others are found to be problematic. Conclusions: Careful analysis of both ethical and educational dimensions can produce meaningful and constructive involvement with the pharmaceutical industry, without inevitably corrupting psychiatric educators.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)215-221
Number of pages7
JournalAcademic Psychiatry
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005

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pharmaceutical industry
Drug Industry
Psychiatry
training program
Education
interaction
conflict of interest
Ethical Analysis
psychiatry
Conflict of Interest
pharmaceutical
Ethics
educator
drug
industry
History
history
education
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Education

Cite this

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AB - Objective: To analyze the educational and ethical issues involved in interactions between departments of psychiatry and the pharmaceutical industry. Methods: The author analyzes the history of attitudes toward pharmaceutical companies, various conflicting ethical principles that apply, and areas of confluence and conflict of interest between psychiatric education and the drug industry. These attitudes are applied to a variety of specific types of interactions with representatives of the pharmaceutical industry. Results: A number of forms of interaction are found to be on balance, ethical, and productive, while others are found to be problematic. Conclusions: Careful analysis of both ethical and educational dimensions can produce meaningful and constructive involvement with the pharmaceutical industry, without inevitably corrupting psychiatric educators.

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