Pulsatile Administration of Low-Dose Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone: Ovulation and Pregnancy in Women With Hypothalamic Amenorrhea

David S. Miller, Robert R. Reid, Nancy S. Cetel, Robert W. Rebar, Samuel S C Yen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We administered pulsatile low doses of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) (1 to 5 μg) to patients whose anovulation was caused by relative and absolute deficiency of endogenous GnRH. Eight such patients, including one with previous pituitary stalk transection, were treated during a total of 23 cycles; pulses of GnRH were administered via a portable pump every 96 or 120 minutes. Activation of pituitary-ovarian function with orderly development of a single dominant follicle, a luteinizing hormone surge, and ovulation occurred in 20 of the 23 cycles. The other three cycles were anovulatory. All patients responded, and five (62%) of the eight conceived, for a total of seven pregnancies and four full-term deliveries of normal infants. This study demonstrates that small pulsatile doses of GnRH can activate cyclic pituitary-ovarian function in hypogonadotropin-acyclic women and induce ovulation resulting in pregnancy and live birth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2937-2941
Number of pages5
JournalJAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association
Volume250
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2 1983

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Amenorrhea
Ovulation
Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone
Pregnancy
Anovulation
Live Birth
Pituitary Gland
Luteinizing Hormone

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Pulsatile Administration of Low-Dose Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone : Ovulation and Pregnancy in Women With Hypothalamic Amenorrhea. / Miller, David S.; Reid, Robert R.; Cetel, Nancy S.; Rebar, Robert W.; Yen, Samuel S C.

In: JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 250, No. 21, 02.12.1983, p. 2937-2941.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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