Pursuit Gain and Saccadic Intrusions in First-Degree Relatives of Probands With Schizophrenia

Brett A. Clementz, John A. Sweeney, Michael Hirt, Gretchen Haas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Oculomotor functioning of 26 probands with schizophrenia, 12 spectrum and 46 nonspectrum first-degree relatives, and 38 nonpsychiatric control subjects was evaluated. Spectrum relatives had more anticipatory saccades (ASs) and lower pursuit gain than nonspectrum relatives, who had more ASs and lower pursuit gain than control subjects. Probands also had lower pursuit gain than nonspectrum relatives and control subjects but did not differ from other groups on AS frequency. Control subjects had more globally accurate pursuit tracking (root mean square [RMS] error deviation) than both relative groups, whereas probands had the poorest RMS scores. Square wave jerk frequency did not differentiate the groups. Attention enhancement affected the frequency of ASs but did not affect either the other intrusive saccadic event or RMS scores. These results offer evidence that eye-movement dysfunction may serve as a biological marker for schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)327-335
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume99
Issue number4
StatePublished - Nov 1990

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Saccades
Schizophrenia
Eye Movements
Biomarkers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Pursuit Gain and Saccadic Intrusions in First-Degree Relatives of Probands With Schizophrenia. / Clementz, Brett A.; Sweeney, John A.; Hirt, Michael; Haas, Gretchen.

In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology, Vol. 99, No. 4, 11.1990, p. 327-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clementz, Brett A. ; Sweeney, John A. ; Hirt, Michael ; Haas, Gretchen. / Pursuit Gain and Saccadic Intrusions in First-Degree Relatives of Probands With Schizophrenia. In: Journal of Abnormal Psychology. 1990 ; Vol. 99, No. 4. pp. 327-335.
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