Racial and ethnic differences in treatment outcomes among adults with stimulant use disorders after a dosed exercise intervention

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Abstract

The current study examined differences in substance abuse treatment outcomes among racial and ethnic groups enrolled in the Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) trial, a multisite randomized clinical trial implemented through the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s (NIDA’s) Clinical Trials Network (CTN). STRIDE aimed to test vigorous exercise as a novel approach to the treatment of stimulant abuse compared to a health education intervention. A hurdle model with a complier average causal effects (CACE) adjustment was used to provide an unbiased estimate of the exercise effect had all participants been adherent to exercise. Among 214 exercise-adherent participants, we found significantly lower probability of use for Blacks (z = −2.45, p = .014) and significantly lower number of days of use for Whites compared to Hispanics (z = −54.87, p = <.001) and for Whites compared to Blacks (z = −28.54, p = <.001), which suggests that vigorous, regular exercise might improve treatment outcomes given adequate levels of adherence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Ethnicity in Substance Abuse
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 17 2017

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Exercise
drug abuse
substance abuse
health promotion
ethnic group
National Institute on Drug Abuse (U.S.)
abuse
Social Adjustment
Exercise Test
Health Education
Hispanic Americans
Ethnic Groups
Substance-Related Disorders
Randomized Controlled Trials
Clinical Trials
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Ethnicity
  • exercise
  • race
  • stimulant use disorder
  • stimulants

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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abstract = "The current study examined differences in substance abuse treatment outcomes among racial and ethnic groups enrolled in the Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) trial, a multisite randomized clinical trial implemented through the National Institute on Drug Abuse’s (NIDA’s) Clinical Trials Network (CTN). STRIDE aimed to test vigorous exercise as a novel approach to the treatment of stimulant abuse compared to a health education intervention. A hurdle model with a complier average causal effects (CACE) adjustment was used to provide an unbiased estimate of the exercise effect had all participants been adherent to exercise. Among 214 exercise-adherent participants, we found significantly lower probability of use for Blacks (z = −2.45, p = .014) and significantly lower number of days of use for Whites compared to Hispanics (z = −54.87, p = <.001) and for Whites compared to Blacks (z = −28.54, p = <.001), which suggests that vigorous, regular exercise might improve treatment outcomes given adequate levels of adherence.",
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