Rate of progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia in an essential tremor cohort: A prospective, longitudinal study

Keith H. Radler, Maria Anna Zdrodowska, Hollie Dowd, Tess E.K. Cersonsky, Edward D. Huey, Stephanie Cosentino, Elan D. Louis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Essential tremor (ET), among the most common neurological diseases, is associated with cognitive dysfunction. Yet, nearly all knowledge of ET-related cognitive impairment is static and cross-sectional (e.g., prevalence), with virtually no dynamic information (i.e., course and progression, conversion rates, and clinical outcomes). Objectives: To quantify the rate of progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia in a cohort of elderly ET cases. Methods: 167 ET cases, enrolled in a prospective, longitudinal, clinical-pathological study, underwent an extensive neuropsychological testing battery at baseline (T1), 1.5 years (T2), and 3 years (T3). Results of these assessments informed clinical diagnoses of normal cognition (ET-NC), MCI (ET-MCI), and dementia (ET-D). Results: At baseline, 26 cases (82.7 ± 7.7 years) were diagnosed with ET-MCI and were available for follow-up at T2. At T2, three of 26 (11.5%) had converted to ET-D. At the start of T2, 23 cases (83.6 ± 7.7 years) were diagnosed with ET-MCI and were available for follow-up at T3. At T3, six of 23 (26.1%) converted to ET-D. The average annual conversion rate from ET-MCI to ET-D was 12.5%. Conclusions: The study of cognitive impairment in ET is a nascent field, with limited data. We show that the conversion rate from ET-MCI to ET-dementia was 12.5%. Available studies on historical controls have reported conversion rates of 2.6–6.3%. Data such as these systematically fill gaps in knowledge, creating a scientifically-derived knowledge base to guide physicians and patients in clinical settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)38-42
Number of pages5
JournalParkinsonism and Related Disorders
Volume74
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cerebellar diseases
  • Cognitive aging
  • Dementia
  • Essential tremor
  • Movement disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Clinical Neurology

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