Reappraising the prehospital care of the patient with major trauma

P. E. Pepe, M. Eckstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent research efforts have demonstrated that many long-standing practices for the prehospital resuscitation of trauma patients may be inappropriate, particularly in certain circumstances. Traditional practices, such as application of antishock garments and IV fluid administration, may even be detrimental in certain patients with uncontrolled bleeding. Endotracheal intubation, although potentially capable of prolonging a patient's ability to tolerate circulatory arrest, may be harmful if overzealous ventilation further compromises cardiac output in such severe hemodynamic instability. If these procedures delay patient transport, any benefit they may offer could be outweighed by delaying definitive care. To improve current systems of trauma care, future trauma research must address the different mechanisms of injury, the anatomic areas involved, and the physiologic staging in a given patient.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalEmergency Medicine Clinics of North America
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Fingerprint

Patient Care
Wounds and Injuries
Clothing
Intratracheal Intubation
Research
Resuscitation
Cardiac Output
Ventilation
Hemodynamics
Hemorrhage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Nursing(all)
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Reappraising the prehospital care of the patient with major trauma. / Pepe, P. E.; Eckstein, M.

In: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America, Vol. 16, No. 1, 1998, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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