Reduced spontaneous sympathetic nerve activity in multiple sclerosis patients

David M. Keller, Paul J. Fadel, Melissa A. Harnsberger, Gina M. Remington, Elliot Frohman, Scott L. Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For the first time, we obtained direct intra-neural measurements of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) patients to test the hypothesis that spontaneous resting MSNA is reduced in MS patients compared to age, sex-matched healthy controls. Spontaneous MSNA (microneurography; peroneal nerve), plasma norepinephrine, arterial blood pressure (finger photoplethysmography), and heart rate were measured at rest in three groups: 1) relapsing-remitting MS patients on disease modifying therapy only (MS-DT; n = 6); 2) relapsing-remitting MS patients on disease modifying therapy and medications for MS-related symptoms that are known to effect the central nervous system (MS-DT/ST; n = 5), and 3) healthy age and sex-matched controls (CON; n = 6). Compared to the CON group, MSNA burst frequency (bursts/min) was significantly lower in both MS-DT (P = 0.027) and MS-DT/ST groups (P = 0.003). Similarly, MSNA burst incidence (bursts/100 heartbeats) was significantly reduced in both MS-DT (P = 0.049) and MS-DT/ST groups (P = 0.004) compared to the CON group. Burst frequency and burst incidence were not different between MS-DT and MS-DT/ST groups. Resting plasma norepinephrine was also significantly lower in both MS-DT (P = 0.039) and MS-DT/ST groups (P = 0.021) compared to the CON group. Reduced MSNA may signify an important dysfunction in autonomic control of cardiovascular function in patients with MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-214
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume344
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 15 2014

Fingerprint

Multiple Sclerosis
Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Muscles
Norepinephrine
Photoplethysmography
Peroneal Nerve
Incidence
Fingers
Arterial Pressure
Central Nervous System
Heart Rate

Keywords

  • Autonomic dysfunction
  • Blood pressure
  • Microneurography
  • Muscle sympathetic nerve activity
  • Peripheral vasculature
  • Plasma norepinephrine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Keller, D. M., Fadel, P. J., Harnsberger, M. A., Remington, G. M., Frohman, E., & Davis, S. L. (2014). Reduced spontaneous sympathetic nerve activity in multiple sclerosis patients. Journal of the Neurological Sciences, 344(1-2), 210-214. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jns.2014.06.053

Reduced spontaneous sympathetic nerve activity in multiple sclerosis patients. / Keller, David M.; Fadel, Paul J.; Harnsberger, Melissa A.; Remington, Gina M.; Frohman, Elliot; Davis, Scott L.

In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences, Vol. 344, No. 1-2, 15.09.2014, p. 210-214.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Keller, David M. ; Fadel, Paul J. ; Harnsberger, Melissa A. ; Remington, Gina M. ; Frohman, Elliot ; Davis, Scott L. / Reduced spontaneous sympathetic nerve activity in multiple sclerosis patients. In: Journal of the Neurological Sciences. 2014 ; Vol. 344, No. 1-2. pp. 210-214.
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