Retrospective Analysis of Esophageal Heat Transfer for Active Temperature Management in Post-cardiac Arrest, Refractory Fever, and Burn Patients

Melissa Naiman, Andrej Markota, Ahmed Hegazy, John Dingley, Erik Kulstad

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Core temperature management is an important aspect of critical care; preventing unintentional hypothermia, reducing fever, and inducing therapeutic hypothermia when appropriate are each tied to positive health outcomes. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the performance of a new temperature management device that uses the esophageal environment to conduct heat transfer. De-identified patient data were aggregated from three clinical sites where an esophageal heat transfer device (EHTD) was used to provide temperature management. The device was evaluated against temperature management guidelines and best practice recommendations, including performance during induction, maintenance, and cessation of therapy. Across all active cooling protocols, the average time-to-target was 2.37 h and the average maintenance phase was 22.4 h. Patients spent 94.9% of the maintenance phase within ±1.0°C and 67.2% within ±0.5°C (574 and 407 measurements, respectively, out of 605 total). For warming protocols, all of the patient temperature readings remained above 36°C throughout the surgical procedure (average 4.66 h). The esophageal heat transfer device met performance expectations across a range of temperature management applications in intensive care and burn units. Patients met and maintained temperature goals without any reported adverse events.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-168
Number of pages7
JournalMilitary Medicine
Volume183
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2018

Keywords

  • burns
  • critical care
  • post-cardiac arrest
  • refractory fever
  • targeted temperature management
  • therapeutic hypothermia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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