Role of arachidonic acid lipoxygenase metabolites in acetylcholine-induced relaxations of mouse arteries

Kathryn M. Gauthier, Daniel H. Goldman, Nitin T. Aggarwal, Yuttana Chawengsub, J. R. Falck, William B. Campbell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites function as EDHFs in arteries of many species. They mediate cyclooxygenase (COX)- and nitric oxide (NO)-independent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh). However, the role of AA metabolites as relaxing factors in mouse arteries remains incompletely defined. ACh caused concentration-dependent relaxations of the mouse thoracic and abdominal aorta and carotid, femoral, and mesentery arteries (maximal relaxation: 57 ± 4%, 72 ± 4%, 82 ± 3%, 80 ± 3%, and 85 ± 3%, respectively). The NO synthase inhibitor nitro-L-arginine (L{small}-NA; 30 μM) blocked relaxations in the thoracic aorta, and L{small}-NA plus the COX inhibitor indomethacin (10 μM) inhibited relaxations in the abdominal aorta and carotid, femoral, and mesenteric arteries (maximal relaxation: 31 ± 10%, 33 ± 5%, 41 ± 8%, and 73 ± 3%, respectively). In mesenteric arteries, NO- and COX-independent relaxations to ACh were inhibited by the lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitors nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; 10 μM) and BW-755C (200 μM), the K+ channel inhibitor apamin (1 μM), and 60 mM KCl and eliminated by endothelium removal. They were not altered by the cytochrome P-450 inhibitor N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2- propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (20 μM) or the epoxyeicosatrienoic acid antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (10 μM). AA relaxations were attenuated by NDGA or apamin and eliminated by 60 mM KCl. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis revealed arterial [14C]AA metabolites that comigrated with prostaglandins, trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (THETAs), hydroxyepoxyeicosatrienoic acids (HEETAs), and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids were not observed. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of 6-keto-PGF, PGE2, 12-HETE, 15- HETE, HEETAs, 11,12,15-THETA, and 11,14,15-THETA. AA metabolism was blocked by NDGA and endothelium removal. 11(R),12(S),15(S)-THETA relaxations (maximal relaxation: 73 ± 3%) were endothelium independent and blocked by 60 mM KCl. Western immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR of the aorta and mesenteric arteries demonstrated protein and mRNA expression of leukocyte-type 12/15-LO. Thus, in mouse resistance arteries, 12/ 15-LO AA metabolites mediate endothelium-dependent relaxations to ACh and AA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume300
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2011

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Arachidonate Lipoxygenases
Arachidonic Acid
Acetylcholine
Arteries
Acids
Mesenteric Arteries
Endothelium
Apamin
Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acids
Abdominal Aorta
Femoral Artery
Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Thoracic Aorta
Nitric Oxide
4,5-Dihydro-1-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1H-pyrazol-3-amine
12-Hydroxy-5,8,10,14-eicosatetraenoic Acid
Masoprocol
Lipoxygenase Inhibitors
Mesentery
Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors

Keywords

  • 12/15- lipoxygenase
  • Endothelium
  • Endothelium-derived hypolarizing factor
  • Mass spectrometry
  • Potassium channels
  • Trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Role of arachidonic acid lipoxygenase metabolites in acetylcholine-induced relaxations of mouse arteries. / Gauthier, Kathryn M.; Goldman, Daniel H.; Aggarwal, Nitin T.; Chawengsub, Yuttana; Falck, J. R.; Campbell, William B.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 300, No. 3, 03.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gauthier, Kathryn M. ; Goldman, Daniel H. ; Aggarwal, Nitin T. ; Chawengsub, Yuttana ; Falck, J. R. ; Campbell, William B. / Role of arachidonic acid lipoxygenase metabolites in acetylcholine-induced relaxations of mouse arteries. In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2011 ; Vol. 300, No. 3.
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N2 - Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites function as EDHFs in arteries of many species. They mediate cyclooxygenase (COX)- and nitric oxide (NO)-independent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh). However, the role of AA metabolites as relaxing factors in mouse arteries remains incompletely defined. ACh caused concentration-dependent relaxations of the mouse thoracic and abdominal aorta and carotid, femoral, and mesentery arteries (maximal relaxation: 57 ± 4%, 72 ± 4%, 82 ± 3%, 80 ± 3%, and 85 ± 3%, respectively). The NO synthase inhibitor nitro-L-arginine (L{small}-NA; 30 μM) blocked relaxations in the thoracic aorta, and L{small}-NA plus the COX inhibitor indomethacin (10 μM) inhibited relaxations in the abdominal aorta and carotid, femoral, and mesenteric arteries (maximal relaxation: 31 ± 10%, 33 ± 5%, 41 ± 8%, and 73 ± 3%, respectively). In mesenteric arteries, NO- and COX-independent relaxations to ACh were inhibited by the lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitors nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; 10 μM) and BW-755C (200 μM), the K+ channel inhibitor apamin (1 μM), and 60 mM KCl and eliminated by endothelium removal. They were not altered by the cytochrome P-450 inhibitor N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2- propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (20 μM) or the epoxyeicosatrienoic acid antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (10 μM). AA relaxations were attenuated by NDGA or apamin and eliminated by 60 mM KCl. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis revealed arterial [14C]AA metabolites that comigrated with prostaglandins, trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (THETAs), hydroxyepoxyeicosatrienoic acids (HEETAs), and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids were not observed. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of 6-keto-PGF1α, PGE2, 12-HETE, 15- HETE, HEETAs, 11,12,15-THETA, and 11,14,15-THETA. AA metabolism was blocked by NDGA and endothelium removal. 11(R),12(S),15(S)-THETA relaxations (maximal relaxation: 73 ± 3%) were endothelium independent and blocked by 60 mM KCl. Western immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR of the aorta and mesenteric arteries demonstrated protein and mRNA expression of leukocyte-type 12/15-LO. Thus, in mouse resistance arteries, 12/ 15-LO AA metabolites mediate endothelium-dependent relaxations to ACh and AA.

AB - Arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites function as EDHFs in arteries of many species. They mediate cyclooxygenase (COX)- and nitric oxide (NO)-independent relaxations to acetylcholine (ACh). However, the role of AA metabolites as relaxing factors in mouse arteries remains incompletely defined. ACh caused concentration-dependent relaxations of the mouse thoracic and abdominal aorta and carotid, femoral, and mesentery arteries (maximal relaxation: 57 ± 4%, 72 ± 4%, 82 ± 3%, 80 ± 3%, and 85 ± 3%, respectively). The NO synthase inhibitor nitro-L-arginine (L{small}-NA; 30 μM) blocked relaxations in the thoracic aorta, and L{small}-NA plus the COX inhibitor indomethacin (10 μM) inhibited relaxations in the abdominal aorta and carotid, femoral, and mesenteric arteries (maximal relaxation: 31 ± 10%, 33 ± 5%, 41 ± 8%, and 73 ± 3%, respectively). In mesenteric arteries, NO- and COX-independent relaxations to ACh were inhibited by the lipoxygenase (LO) inhibitors nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA; 10 μM) and BW-755C (200 μM), the K+ channel inhibitor apamin (1 μM), and 60 mM KCl and eliminated by endothelium removal. They were not altered by the cytochrome P-450 inhibitor N-methylsulfonyl-6-(2- propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (20 μM) or the epoxyeicosatrienoic acid antagonist 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (10 μM). AA relaxations were attenuated by NDGA or apamin and eliminated by 60 mM KCl. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis revealed arterial [14C]AA metabolites that comigrated with prostaglandins, trihydroxyeicosatrienoic acids (THETAs), hydroxyepoxyeicosatrienoic acids (HEETAs), and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs). Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids were not observed. Mass spectrometry confirmed the identity of 6-keto-PGF1α, PGE2, 12-HETE, 15- HETE, HEETAs, 11,12,15-THETA, and 11,14,15-THETA. AA metabolism was blocked by NDGA and endothelium removal. 11(R),12(S),15(S)-THETA relaxations (maximal relaxation: 73 ± 3%) were endothelium independent and blocked by 60 mM KCl. Western immunoblot analysis and RT-PCR of the aorta and mesenteric arteries demonstrated protein and mRNA expression of leukocyte-type 12/15-LO. Thus, in mouse resistance arteries, 12/ 15-LO AA metabolites mediate endothelium-dependent relaxations to ACh and AA.

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KW - Mass spectrometry

KW - Potassium channels

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