Serum immunoglobulin levels in newborn infants. III. Some preliminary observations from a survey of cord blood levels in 2,600 infants

Janet B. Hardy, George H. McCracken, E. David Mellits, Mary R. Gilkeson, John L. Sever

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

20 Scopus citations

Abstract

Cord serum immunoglobulin G and M levels and their relationship to race, sex, birth weight, and clinical status are examined. The levels of both immunoglobulins are not related to sex. Negro infants have higher IgG and lower IgM levels than Caucasians. IgG levels and birth weight are associated, smaller infants having lower levels. The previously reported relationship between high levels of IgM and congenital infection is confirmed. In addition, a significant relationship between very low levels and adverse fetal outcome is demonstrated by neurologic abnormalities, severe congenital malformations, and perinatal deaths.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1211-1223
Number of pages13
JournalThe Journal of pediatrics
Volume75
Issue number6 PART 2
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1969

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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