Sleep after TBI

How the TBI Model Systems have advanced the field

Kathleen R Bell, Tamara Bushnik, Kristen Dams-O'Connor, Yelena Goldin, Jeanne M. Hoffman, Anthony H. Lequerica, Risa Nakase-Richardson, Jennifer M. Zumsteg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Identification and management of comorbidities in TBI has become an increasing focus for optimizing TBI outcomes. Recent meta-analyses highlight sleep disturbance and sleep disorders following TBI (Mathias & Alvaro, 2012). Improving the recognition and treatment of sleep disorders in TBI should be a central focus of rehabilitation. The Traumatic Brain Injury Model System (TBIMS) has created an infrastructure allowing multi-center investigations into sleep dysfunction in those who have had a moderate to severe TBI and received inpatient rehabilitation. Objective: This paper will describe the 1) infrastructure used to advance sleep dysfunction/disorders research following TBI, 2) preliminary findings from these studies, and 3) repository of data which can be accessed for secondary analyses by investigators outside of the TBIMS infrastructure. Methods: Two internal mechanisms allow investigators at TBIMS sites to collaborate on projects of shared interest: Research Modules and Special Interest Groups (SIG). Results: To date, five studies have resulted from the TBIMS collaborative process focusing on insomnia, circadian disruption, and sleep apnea. Conclusions: Future directions for the SIG include continued development of available knowledge and understanding of the multidimensional factors that contribute to TBI-related sleep disturbance, optimal assessment tools, effectiveness of available treatments, and treatment compliance in this population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)287-296
Number of pages10
JournalNeuroRehabilitation
Volume43
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Sleep
Public Opinion
Rehabilitation
Research Personnel
Sleep Apnea Syndromes
Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Research
Meta-Analysis
Comorbidity
Inpatients
Traumatic Brain Injury
Therapeutics
Population
Sleep Wake Disorders

Keywords

  • Sleep disorders
  • sleep dysfunction
  • traumatic brain injury
  • traumatic brain injury model systems

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Bell, K. R., Bushnik, T., Dams-O'Connor, K., Goldin, Y., Hoffman, J. M., Lequerica, A. H., ... Zumsteg, J. M. (2018). Sleep after TBI: How the TBI Model Systems have advanced the field. NeuroRehabilitation, 43(3), 287-296. https://doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182538

Sleep after TBI : How the TBI Model Systems have advanced the field. / Bell, Kathleen R; Bushnik, Tamara; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Goldin, Yelena; Hoffman, Jeanne M.; Lequerica, Anthony H.; Nakase-Richardson, Risa; Zumsteg, Jennifer M.

In: NeuroRehabilitation, Vol. 43, No. 3, 01.01.2018, p. 287-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bell, KR, Bushnik, T, Dams-O'Connor, K, Goldin, Y, Hoffman, JM, Lequerica, AH, Nakase-Richardson, R & Zumsteg, JM 2018, 'Sleep after TBI: How the TBI Model Systems have advanced the field', NeuroRehabilitation, vol. 43, no. 3, pp. 287-296. https://doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182538
Bell KR, Bushnik T, Dams-O'Connor K, Goldin Y, Hoffman JM, Lequerica AH et al. Sleep after TBI: How the TBI Model Systems have advanced the field. NeuroRehabilitation. 2018 Jan 1;43(3):287-296. https://doi.org/10.3233/NRE-182538
Bell, Kathleen R ; Bushnik, Tamara ; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen ; Goldin, Yelena ; Hoffman, Jeanne M. ; Lequerica, Anthony H. ; Nakase-Richardson, Risa ; Zumsteg, Jennifer M. / Sleep after TBI : How the TBI Model Systems have advanced the field. In: NeuroRehabilitation. 2018 ; Vol. 43, No. 3. pp. 287-296.
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