Static handgrip exercise modifies arterial baroreflex control of vascular sympathetic outflow in humans

Atsunori Kamiya, Daisaku Michikami, Qi Fu, Yuki Niimi, Satoshi Iwase, Tadaaki Mano, Akio Suzumura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Scopus citations

Abstract

To examine effects of static exercise on the arterial baroreflex control of vascular sympathetic nerve activity, 22 healthy male volunteers performed 2 min of static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary force, followed by postexercise circulatory arrest (PE-CA). Microneurographic recording of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) was made with simultaneous recording of arterial pressure (Portapres). The relationship between MSNA and diastolic arterial pressure was calculated for each condition and was defined as the arterial baroreflex function. There was a close relationship between MSNA and diastolic arterial pressure in each subject at rest and during static exercise and PE-CA. The slope of the relationship significantly increased by >300% during static exercise (P < 0.001), and the x-axis intercept (diastolic arterial pressure level) increased by 13 mmHg during exercise (P < 0.001). These alterations in the baroreflex relationship were completely maintained during PE-CA. It is concluded that static hand-grip exercise is associated with a resetting of the operating range and an increase in the reflex gain of the arterial barorelex control of MSNA.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)R1134-R1139
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Regulatory Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume281
Issue number4 50-4
StatePublished - Oct 20 2001

Keywords

  • Arterial pressure
  • Microneurography
  • Muscle sympathetic nerve activity
  • Pressor response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

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