Steroid secretion by ACTH-stimulated human fetal adrenal tissue during the first week in organ culture

B. R. Carr, C. R. Parker, L. Milewich, J. C. Porter, P. C. MacDonald, E. R. Simpson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Scopus citations

Abstract

Fetal adrenal tissue has been reported to lose its in vivo secretory pattern by virtue of a loss of fetal zone cells after the first week in culture. Consequently, we studied the steroidogenic capacity and the responsiveness to ACTH of human fetal adrenal tissue during the first week in organ culture. The culture medium was removed daily and assayed for cortisol and dehydroisoandrosterone sulfate (DS). First, as the concentration of ACTH in the medium was increased from 0 to 1 μg/ml steroid secretion increased. When tissue fragments were maintained in the absence of ACTH for 3 to 4 days, there was a striking increase in steroid secretion upon addition of ACTH to the medium, with larger rates of secretion of cortisol than DS being observed. Second, the steroidogenic capacity of the separate zones of the fetal adrenal gland was assessed. Tissue from the fetal zone secreted large amounts of DS and small amounts of cortisol, whereas neocortex tissue secreted similar quantities of DS and cortisol. Third, fetal zone tissue was maintained the absence of ACTH for 4 days and thereafter ACTH was added to the media for an additional 6 days. In this experiment, there was a marked increase in DS secretion rate after the addition of ACTH and a smaller increase in cortisol secretion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)563-574
Number of pages12
JournalSteroids
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1980

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Endocrinology
  • Pharmacology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Organic Chemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Steroid secretion by ACTH-stimulated human fetal adrenal tissue during the first week in organ culture'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this