Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. Updates in Diagnosis and Management

Brit Long, Alex Koyfman, Michael S. Runyon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a neurologic emergency due to bleeding into the subarachnoid space. Mortality can reach 50%. The clinical presentation is most often in the form of headache, classically defined as maximal at onset and worst of life. The most common cause is traumatic; approximately 80% of nontraumatic SAH are due to aneurysmal rupture, with the remainder from idiopathic peri-mesencephalic hemorrhage or other less common causes. Noncontrast brain computed tomography (CT) performed within 6 hours of symptom onset has sensitivity approaching 100%. Lumbar puncture may be considered after this period for definitive diagnosis if initial CT is normal.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEmergency Medicine Clinics of North America
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2017

Fingerprint

Subarachnoid Hemorrhage
Tomography
Hemorrhage
Subarachnoid Space
Spinal Puncture
Nervous System
Headache
Rupture
Emergencies
Mortality
Brain

Keywords

  • Angiography
  • Cerebral aneurysm
  • Computed tomography
  • Lumbar puncture
  • Rebleed
  • Subarachnoid hemorrhage
  • Vasospasm
  • Xanthochromia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. Updates in Diagnosis and Management. / Long, Brit; Koyfman, Alex; Runyon, Michael S.

In: Emergency Medicine Clinics of North America, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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